Print this chapterPrint this chapter

UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Master of Education in Advanced Teaching (M.Ed.)

EDUC 5240 Creating Positive Classroom Environments

UoPeople logo


EDUC 5240: Creating Positive Classroom Environments


Credits: 3

Course Description: 

This course will focus on the role of classroom organization and behavior management in developing positive teaching and learning environments.  The impact of the physical environment, transitions, procedures, norms and expectations on managing behavior will be discussed.  Developing communication and social skills and fostering a collaborative relationship between the teacher and students will be examined.  Alternative approaches to managing routine and disruptive discipline problems while also creating learning spaces where students are willing to take risks and learn from mistakes will be considered.  


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Assess the importance of creating positive classroom environments.
  2. Examine different options in regards to behavior management. 
  3. Correlate classroom organization to student behavior. 
  4. Analyze methods and best practices for improving student/teacher rapport and communication. 
  5. Brainstorm and propose practices that can be applied in real-life classroom settings.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week.

Week 1: Unit 1 - Elements of Classroom Management & The Positive Classroom

Week 2: Unit 2 - Models of Discipline

Week 3: Unit 3 - Creating & Implementing Rules & Procedures

Week 4: Unit 4 - Using Your Physical Space

Week 5: Unit 5 - Discipline Challenges

Week 6: Unit 6 - Creating and Upholding Student Expectations

Week 7: Unit 7 - Communication, Collaboration, & Rapport

Week 8: Unit 8 - Diversity Issues in the Classroom


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.  The Learning Guides for all units open on the first day of class.  Please review all Learning Guides to access the readings, review assignments, etc. 

Unit 1: Elements of Classroom Management & The Positive Classroom

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

1.  Burden, P.R. (2017).  Classroom management:  Creating a successful K-12 learning community (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ:  WileyRetrieved from here

  • Read pages 2-6 of this text. It provides a thorough overview of classroom management and its different facets.

 2.  Great Schools Partnership (2014). Classroom management. Retrieved from https://www.edglossary.org/classroom-management/   

  •  This resource provides an overview of the elements commonly included under the umbrella term ‘classroom management.’

 3.  Kratochwill,T.R., DeRoos, R., & Blair, S. (n.d.). Classroom management: Teachers modules. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/education/k12/classroom-mgmt.aspx

  •  This resource discusses the importance of classroom management and the concept of three-tiered positive behavior support.

4.   International Baccalaureate. (2010). The IB Learner Profile: A singular capacity for invigorating campus life. Retrieved from https://www.ibo.org/globalassets/publications/recognition/learnerprofile-en.pdf

  • This website provides the characteristics of an IB Learner.

5.  Marzano, R.J., Marzano, J.S., & Pickering D.J. (2003) Chapter 1. The critical role of classroom management. Classroom Management that Works. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/103027/chapters/The-Critical-Role-of-Classroom-Management.aspx

  •  The first chapter of the book Classroom Management that Works, this resource provides research and statistic on the effects of classroom management on schools and learning.

6.  Marzano, R. J.  (2011). Art and science of teaching/classroom management: Whose job is it? Coaching: The New Leadership Skill, 69 (2)85-86. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct11/vol69/num02/Classroom-Management@-Whose-Job-Is-It%C2%A2.aspx

  • This article argues that the responsibility of classroom management falls not only on the teacher but also administrators and students.

7.  Sieberer-Nagler, K. (2016). Effective classroom-management & positive teaching. English Language Teaching, 9 (1). Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1087130.pdf

  •  This article explains the connection between classroom management and positive learning environments, specifically focusing on methods and best practices.

8.  Choe, Y. (n.d.). Becoming a positive teacher. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ascd-express/vol4/405-newvoices.aspx

  •  This first-person account of a middle school teacher explains her change from misery to happiness in the classroom.

9.  Wolk, S. (2008). Joy in school. The Positive Classroom, 66 (1), 8-15. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept08/vol66/num01/Joy-in-School.aspx

  •  This resource provides examples of how teachers can improve student (and teacher) happiness in school, and how that can positively affect the school.

10.  Young, J. (2014). The importance of a positive classroom. Encouragement in the Classroom: How Do I Help Students Stay Positive and Focused. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/sf114049/chapters/The-Importance-of-a-Positive-Classroom.aspx

  •  This resource gives a brief introduction to positive classrooms and what teachers should focus on in order to achieve them.

Optional Videos

1.  Ernst, A. & Wegdam, M. (Producers). (2011). The community college classroom. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/new-teacher-classroom-management

  •  This video shows classroom interaction between a new teacher and her grade 6 social studies class before and after meeting with a classroom management specialist.

Unit 2: Models of Discipline

  • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

Low-Teacher Control/The Guiding Method

1. Creation House, (n.d.) Between Parent and Child: The work of Haim G. Ginott. Retrieved from http://www.betweenparentandchild.com/index.php?s=content&p=Haim.

  • This resource explains Ginott's philosophy on parenting.

2.  Delisio, E.R. (2008). Practicing Love & Logic can mean happier schools. Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin536.shtml

  •  This article outlines Jim Fay and David Funk’s theory of “love and logic” which focuses on creating independent thinkers and learners through modeling and shared control.

    3.  Filas, C. (2015). Teaching inner discipline to students: An interview with Barbara Coloroso. Retrieved from https://www.myatp.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Synergy-Vol-8-Coloroso.pdf

    • This resource is an interview transcript with Barbara Coloroso, famed for her work on anti-bullying, who is a firm believer in teaching children inner discipline skills.

    4.  Kohn, A. (1995). Discipline is the problem- Not the solution. Retrieved from https://www.alfiekohn.org/article/discipline-problem-solution/

    • This article by former teacher Alfie Kohn discusses the importance of creating a positive learning community to decrease discipline problems, instead of resorting to threats and bribes.

    Medium-Teacher Control/The Interacting Model

    5. NEA. (2019). Classroom Management. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/tools/ClassroomManagement.html

    • This website provides several articles on classroom management techniques.

    6.  Charles, C.M. (2007). Chapter 12: Linda Albert’s cooperative discipline. In Building Classroom Management, 9th ed. (chapter 12). Retrieved from http://faculty.washington.edu/cadavis1/503%20Readings/AlbertChapter.pdf

    • Read pages 199-208 in this textbook chapter which focuses on Linda Albert’s discipline theory of cooperative discipline aimed at improving students’ self-esteem and decrease discipline problems.

    7.  Nelsen, J., & Gfroer, K. (2017). Positive discipline tools for teachers: Effective classroom management for social, emotional, and academic success. Retrieved from here

    • Read pages 1-8 (introduction) which summarizes Nelsen’s theory of positive classroom discipline, focusing on improving classroom management by determining how to analyze students’ behaviors.

      8.  Henry, S.E. & Abowitz, K.K. (1998). Interpreting Glasser’s control theory: Problems that emerge from innate needs and predetermined ends. In R.E. Butchart and B.E. McEwan (Eds.), Classroom Discipline in American Schools: Problems and Possibilities for Democratic Education. Retrieved from here

      • Read pages 157-163 of this resource which focuses on William Glasser’s control theory, a method that encourages student decision-making through teacher encouragement.

      9.  Curwin, R., Mendler, A., & Mendler, B. (2018). Chapter 1: Core beliefs and principles. In Discipline with Dignity: How to Build Responsibility and Respect in Your Classroom, 4th ed. (chapter 11). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/118018/chapters/Core-Beliefs-and-Principles.aspx

      • This chapter provides a thorough summary of the Discipline with Dignity model which focuses on creating a plan with students to help them with their decision-making abilities.

      10.  Kagan, S. (2002) What is win-win discipline? Retrieved from https://www.kaganonline.com/free_articles/dr_spencer_kagan/ASK15.php

      • This article discusses Kagan’s win-win method of discipline which encourages responsible student problem-solving and solution planning.

      High-Teacher Control/The Intervening Model

      11.  Mather, N. & Goldstein, S. (2001). Behavior modification in the classroom. Retrieved from http://www.ldonline.org/article/6030

      • This article provides a summary of B.F. Skinner’s theory of behavior modification, also known as operant conditioning, and how it specifically relates to education.

      12.  Sandidge, R.F. (2009). Assertive discipline. In E.M. Anderman & L.H. Anderman (Eds.) Psychology of Classroom Learning: An Encyclopedia. Retrieved from Gale Virtual Reference Library (Note: search in Gale for the author and the title using Library Resources)

      • Read the section on assertive discipline (pages 166-168) which summarizes Lee and Marlene Canter’s theory of assertive discipline, a model that utilizes consequences to teach behavior.

      13.  Jones, F. (n.d.). Positive classroom discipline: Chapter 18- Discipline management. Retrieved from http://www.fredjones.com/discipline-18-1

      • This source, from Jones’ book Positive Classroom Discipline, summarizes his method of positive discipline which focuses on a three-level system.

      14.  Marshall, M. (2017). How to discipline without stress, punishment, or rewards. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/discipline-without-stress-punishment-or-rewards-3110686

      • In this article, Marshall summarizes his Discipline Without Stress program which encourages teachers to not control students but to teach them social skills.
      Optional Video

        1.  Five Criteria for Positive Discipline (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.teachertube.com/video/five-criteria-for-positive-discipline-65137

        • In this video, Nelsen explains her five criteria for positive discipline and how to apply them.

        Unit 3: Creating & Implementing Rules & Procedures

        • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
        • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
        • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
        • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
        • Begin and participate in the Group Activity (Due Unit 7)
        • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

        Reading Assignment

        To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

        1.  McEwan, B. (1997). Contradiction, Paradox, and Irony: The World of Classroom Management. In R.E. Butchart & B. McEwan (eds) Classroom Discipline in American Schools (chapter 5). 

        • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
        • Read chapter 5 (pages 66-75) which offers some of the issues teacher face in regards to finding the balance between classroom management, discipline, and a positive classroom environment.

          2.  Marzano, R.J., Marzano, J.S., & Pickering, D. (2003). Classroom management that works: Research-based strategies for every teacher. 

          • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
          • Read pages 13-26 which provide a summary of past research on rule/procedure creation in addition to the different elements to consider.

          3.  Partin, R.L. (2009). Classroom teacher’s survival guide: Practical strategies, management techniques and reproducibles for new and experienced teachers. 

          • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
          • Read pages 30-35 of Partin’s book which concentrates on best practices for creating classroom rules.

          4.  Rosevear, J.E. (2009). First month: Classroom rules that work. Instructor, 119 (1), 57. 

          • To access this article log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Academic OneFile
          • Geared towards middle school teachers, this article provides five rules that she considers best practices

          5.  Wong, H.K. (2014). Proceed with intent: At the heart of a classroom management plan is practice and more practice of key procedures. Instructor, 124 (3), 32+. 

          • To access this article log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Academic OneFile
          • In this article, Wong discusses the importance of procedures for certain tasks in addition to methods for teaching students the procedures.

          6.  Wong, H., Wong, R., Rogers, K., & Brooks, A. (2012). Managing your classroom for success: Organization in the first week is the foundation for a successful school year. Science and Children, 49 (9), 60+. 

          • To access this article log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Academic OneFile
          • In this article, the authors discuss how planning and preparing classroom rules and procedures contribute to classroom management.

          7.  Alber, R. (2017). Rules and routines in the classroom. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/rules-routines-school-year-start-classroom-management

          • In this blog, a teacher reflects on her own classroom rules and provide some best practices for creating them.
          Optional Videos

            1.  Missouri School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (2016). Content acquisition podcast: Classroom rules and expectations. Retrieved from http://pbismissouri.org/content-acquisition-podcast-classroom-rules-and-expectations/

            • This video breaks down the theory and application of creating classroom rules.

            2.  Missouri School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (2016). Classroom procedure and routines content acquisition video. Retrieved from http://pbismissouri.org/classroom-procedures-and-routines-content-acquisition-video/

            • This video explains the theory behind and application of creating and teaching classroom procedures.

            Unit 4: Using Your Physical Space

            • Peer assess Unit 3 Written Assignment
            • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
            • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
            • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
            • Continue to participate in the Group Activity

            Reading Assignment

            To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.


            Classroom Organization

              1.  Johnson, J. Halocha, J. & Charter, M. (2007). Developing teaching skills in the primary school. 

              • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
              • Read chapter 3 (pages 29-42) which offers important reflective questions all teachers must answer before making classroom organization decisions.

              2.  Hue, M., & Wai-shing, L. (2008). Classroom management: Creating a positive learning environment

              • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
              • Read pages 48-50 which discuss best practices in classroom organization, focusing specifically on utilizing your space effectively.

              3.  Bunyi, A. (n.d.). 6 classroom design tips. Retrieved from https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/6-classroom-design-tips/

              • This brief article provides a teacher’s first-hand account of how she approached classroom design.

                Seating Arrangements

                4.  Tomlinson, C.A. & Imbeau, M.B. (2010). Leading and managing a differentiated classroom. Retrieved from 

                • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                • Read pages 92-98 which focus on setting up a classroom that encourages student communication and group work.

                5.  Petlak, L. (2015). Functional, flexible classroom seating options. Retrieved from https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/lindsey-petlak/functional-flexible-classroom-seating-options/

                • The blog provides descriptions of some alternative seating options for students.

                Learning/Activity Centers

                6.  Hilberg, R.S., Chang, J., & Epaloosse, G. (2003). Designing effective activity centers for diverse learners: A guide for teachers at all grade levels and for all subject areas. Retrieved from http://manoa.hawaii.edu/coe/crede/wp-content/uploads/Hilberg_et_al_20031.pdf

                • Read pages 1-11. This very thorough handbook explains the background/theory of activity centers in addition to step by step instructions and examples for application.

                7.  McKnight, K.S. (2014). Common core literacy strategies for ELA, history/social studies, and the humanities, grades 6-12: Strategies to deepen content knowledge (grades 6-12). 

                • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                • Read Chapter 6 (pages 131-142) which focuses on how to set up and use learning/activity centers. Although the book is geared towards middle and high school students, the methods can be adapted for younger students.

                8.  Spencer-Waterman, S. (2014). Handbook on differentiated instruction for middle and high schools. 

                • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                • Read pages 94-97 which gives examples of how to apply learning centers for differentiated instruction.

                Optional Video

                1.  Adding Color to the Classroom (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/color-in-the-classroom

                • This video shows some ideas for how to incorporate color into the classroom to add to positivity.

                2.  McLeod, J., Fisher, J., & Hoover, G. (2003). Key elements of classroom management: Managing time and space, student behavior, and instructional strategies. Retrieved from http://www.lirn.net/databases/17237/

                • Read chapter 1 (pages 5-19) which provides a summary of elements to consider when thinking of physical space in the classroom.

                Unit 5: Discipline Challenges

                • Peer assess Unit 4 Written Assignment
                • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
                • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

                Reading Assignment

                To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

                1.  Boynton, M. & Boynton, C. (2005). Educator’s guide to preventing and solving discipline problems. 

                • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                • Read Sections 3 & 4 (pages 89-167) which focus on methods and best practices for dealing with behavior and discipline challenges in the classroom.

                2.  Hue, M. & Li, W. (2008). Classroom management: Creating a positive learning environment.

                • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                • Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 63-107) which provide background, theory, and best practices on dealing with students who misbehave in class.

                3.  Alen, K.P. (2010). Classroom management, bullying, and teacher practices. The Professional Educator, 34 (1). Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ988197.pdf

                • This article provides a thorough discussion of past research and literature on the connection between classroom management and bullying.
                Optional Video

                  1.  Pacer (2018). Ways to be there as an adult- Episode 17. Retrieved from http://www.pacer.org/bullying/video/player.asp?video=113 (4:17)

                  • This video provides some strategies for teachers in regards to helping students deal with bullying.

                  Unit 6: Creating and Upholding Student Expectations

                  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
                  • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
                  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

                  Reading Assignment

                  To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

                   The Pygmalion Effect

                  1.  Ellison, K. (2015). Being honest about the Pygmalion Effect. Retrieved from http://discovermagazine.com/2015/dec/14-great-expectations

                  • This article provides a summary of the Pygmalion Effect and some classroom applications.

                  2.  Spiegel, A. (2012). Teacher’s expectations can influence how students perform. Retrieved from https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2012/09/18/161159263/teachers-expectations-can-influence-how-students-perform

                  • This article connects a modern-day classroom to Rosenthal’s study and provides some reflective teacher questions.
                  • Hit the ‘play’ button in the top right corner to hear a further explanation of the article as it was discussed on NPR radio.

                  Best Practices

                  3.  Ritchhart, R. (2015). Creating cultures of thinking: The 8 forces we must master to truly transform our schools. Retrieved from 

                  • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                  • Read chapter 2 (pages 37-60) which focuses on the different types of expectations teachers should have for their students and how to apply them in the classroom.

                  4.  Harris, S. (2005). Bravo teacher: Building relationships with actions that value others

                  • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                  • Read chapters 1-3 (pages 1-58) which provide a variety of actions and best practices that can be applied to any grade level in order to encourage and support students.

                  5.  Hill, J. (n.d.). The power of high expectations: Closing the gap in your classroom. Retrieved from http://teachingasleadership.org/sites/default/files/Related-Readings/DCA_Ch2_2011.pdf

                  • This document provides varied perspectives on holding students to high academic standards and how those expectations can affect students.

                  6.  Bell, L. (2007). Creating a culture of high expectations for all students. Retrieved from https://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/columnists/bell/bell003.shtml

                  • This blog by Larry Bell, a well-known educational speaker, provides some best practices for creating a positive classroom culture in regards to supporting students.
                  Optional Video

                    1.  EL Education (2015). Clear expectations and important work empower students to work independently: Management in the active classroom. Retrieved from https://vimeo.com/115977648 (4:52)

                    • This video clip demonstrates how a teacher who promotes independence and self-efficacy can use time to work more personally with students.

                     Unit 7: Communication, Collaboration, & Rapport

                    • Peer assess Unit 6 Written Assignment
                    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
                    • Complete and submit the Group Activity
                    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

                    Reading Assignment

                    To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

                    1.  Hue, M. & Li, W. (2008). Classroom management: Creating a positive learning environment. 

                    • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                    • Read chapters 6, 8, 9 (pages 109-128, 149-182) which focus on communicating with all three groups: parents, students, and colleagues.

                    2.  Higgs, C. (2013). Connecting with students: Building rapport with urban learners. 

                    • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                    • Read pages 34-56 which focus on strategies to use to ‘get through’ to students while increasing rapport.

                    3.  Stanford University (n.d.). Student-teacher communication. Retrieved from https://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/resources/teaching/student-teacher-communication

                    • Read through all four links on this page which provide some best practices on communicating with students, including the topics of questioning, listening, and interacting.
                    Optional Video

                    1. Teaching Channel. (n.d.). Communicate learning with silent signals. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teacher-teams-nvps (1:51)

                    • This video shows how one teacher uses body language and signals to keep students engaged and communication without ever having to say a word, a great resource for quiet students.

                    Unit 8: Diversity Issues in the Classroom

                    • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
                    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment
                    • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

                    Reading Assignment


                    To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

                    Multiculturalism

                    1.  Anderman, E.M. & Anderman, L.H. (2009). Culturally relevant pedagogy. In Psychology of Classroom Learning: An Encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3027800087/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=c34926f4

                    • This book chapter focuses on how teachers can and should be prepared for diverse classes and multicultural learning.

                    2.  Lehman, C.L. (2017). Multicultural competence: A literature review supporting focused training for preservice teachers teaching diverse students. Journal of Education and Practice, 8 (10), 109-116. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1139702.pdf

                    • This document provides a helpful review of literature that relates to issues new teachers face in regards to student diversity.

                    3.  Yokota, J. (2009). Learning through literature that offers diverse perspectives: Multicultural and international literature. In D.A. Wooten & B.E. Cullinan (Eds.), Children’s Literature in the Reading Program: An Invitation to Read. 3rd ed. Retrieved from http://sites.bu.edu/summerliteracyinstitute/files/2015/05/YokotaJ-Learning-Through-Literature.pdf

                    • This book chapter focuses on choosing and using multicultural literature in the classroom.

                    Differentiation

                    4.  Tomlinson, C.A. (2014). Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. Retrieved from 

                    • To access this resource, log into Moodle and access Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) located in the Uopeople Library under the Resources tab. In the search field at the top of the page, copy and paste the title of the article. This article is located in a database called Ebook Central: Academic Complete
                    • Read chapters 1-4 (pages 1-59) which provide an explanation of differentiation in addition to strategies for differentiated instruction.

                    Optional Video

                    1.  Guido, M. (2016). 20 differentiated instruction strategies and examples [+downloadable list]. Retrieved from https://www.prodigygame.com/blog/differentiated-instruction-strategies-examples-download/ (4:16)

                    • Watch the video and read the blog which both provides a variety of activities for differentiating instruction and assessment.

                    Course Requirements:

                    Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
                    Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating (out of a 10 point scale) are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

                    Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
                    Most units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment, which may come in many forms (case study, research paper, etc.). You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

                    Group Activities
                    During this course, you will be required to complete work as part of a small group. Group work is an important component of your coursework, as it allows you to deepen relationships with classmates, and gain a more thorough understanding of the topics presented in this course. Further, group work mimics the business environment in which projects are often conducted in small teams across different departments. You will be randomly assigned to your groups and are expected to work with your teammates throughout the term for all group activities.

                    Reflective Portfolio Activities
                    Portfolio Activities are tools for self-reflection and evaluation within the context of the course. These activities are designed as a means to document and critically reflect upon your learning process. Activities you develop for this course will be kept in your Research and Practice Portfolio and will be important as you progress towards the final courses in your program, particularly the Advanced Practice and Capstone courses.  Ideally, you will draw from your coursework and experiences, as well as what you’ve learned in other courses, and your own current teaching practice to showcase your overall growth and examine ways in which you can continue to develop and sharpen your research interests and expand your cadre of instructional methods.

                    The Research and Practice Portfolio
                    Throughout the M.Ed. Program, you will be building a portfolio of instructional strategies and materials, and acquiring knowledge and skills for advanced professional practice.  Students begin building their portfolio right from start.  It serves as a repository for research findings and sample units and lessons.  Students use it to archive ideas and resources related to instructional methods, classroom management, and assessment.  The portfolio supports your own self-reflection on changes that demonstrate growth in professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes that is part of the Capstone experience.    The component parts of the Research and Practice Portfolio include:

                    • Reflective Portfolio Activities
                    • Research
                    • Teaching and Learning Resources

                    Course Forum
                    The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.

                    Course Policies:

                    Grading Components and Weights
                    Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

                    Discussion Assignments  20%
                    Written Assignments    30% 
                    Group Activity  25%
                    Reflective Portfolio Activities  25%
                    TOTAL 100%


                    Grading Scale
                    This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

                    Letter Grade
                    Grade Scale Grade Points
                    A+ 98-100 4.00
                    A 93-97 4.00
                    A- 90-92 3.67
                    B+ 88-89 3.33
                    B 83-87 3.00
                    B- 80-82 2.67
                    C+ 78-79 2.33
                    C 73-77 2.00
                    C- 70-72 0.00
                    D+ 68-69 0.00
                    D 63-67 0.00
                    D- 60-62 0.00
                    F Under 60 0.00
                    CR N/A N/A
                    NC N/A N/A
                    NF N/A N/A
                    W N/A N/A


                    Grade Appeal

                    If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

                    Participation
                    Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

                    • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
                    • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
                    • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
                    • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

                    Academic Honesty and Integrity
                    When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

                    Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several styles and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

                    Code of Conduct
                    University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.