UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Master of Education in Advanced Teaching (M.Ed.)

EDUC 5010 Education in Context: History, Philosophy, and Sociology

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EDUC 5010: Education in Context: History, Philosophy, and Sociology


Credits: 3


Course Description: 

This course will examine the role of education across time and in different places in the world, and the social and political influences that shaped the goals and structure of today’s diverse educational systems.  The contributions of classical and modern thinkers and their impact on contemporary education and on the role and function of the teacher will be explored.  Analysis of globalization and the nature of differing educational systems and values will provide a context for reflecting on one’s own personal philosophy of education.

Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Examine the changing role of educational and instructional models (active learning, critical thinking), multiculturally, and/or over time.
  2. Explore classical and modern philosophies and their impact on contemporary education.
  3. Analyze the globalization and the nature of different educational systems and values to provide reflecting on one's own personal philosophy of education.
  4. Examine the global, social, and political influences that shaped the goals and structure of today's diverse educational systems.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week.

Week 1: Unit 1 - History and Purpose of Schooling in the United States

Week 2: Unit 2 - Historical Global Foundations of Education

Week 3: Unit 3 - Philosophical Foundations of Education

Week 4: Unit 4 - Global Philosophical Foundations in Education

Week 5: Unit 5 - Sociological Foundations of Education

Week 6: Unit 6 - Social & Political Issues

Week 7: Unit 7 - Global Standings and Perspectives  

Week 8: Unit 8 - The Role of Educators in a Changing World


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.  The Learning Guides for all units open on the first day of class.  Please review all Learning Guides to access the readings, review assignments, etc. 

Unit 1: History and Purpose of Schooling in the United States

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment


To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

History and Purpose of Education and Schooling

1. GOV.UK. (2015, July 9).  The Purpose of education. Retrieved March 04, 2018, from https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/the-purpose-of-education

  • The British Minister of Education explains his vision for the purpose of British Education.

2. Reimers, F. (2017, August 03). Rediscovering the cosmopolitan moral purpose of education. Retrieved February 22, 2018, from https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/rediscovering-the-cosmopolitan-moral-purpose-of-education/ 

  • This opinion piece from the Brookings Institute discusses the changing purpose of education in a globalized society. (PDF is available for download at the website).

3. Learning in Mind. (n.d.). The Meaning and Purpose of Education. Retrieved February 26, 2018, from http://learninginmind.com/meaning-of-education.php

  • This article poses that the purpose of education may not be as noble as we assume.    

4. King, M. L., Jr . (1947.). The Purpose of Education. Retrieved February 28, 2018, from http://okra.stanford.edu/transcription/document_images/Vol01Scans/123_Jan-Feb1947_The%20Purpose%20of%20Education.pdf

  • This is the text of a speech that Martin Luther King Jr. gave on the purpose of education and provides yet another perspective.

5. Walker, T. (2016, August 29). What’s the Purpose of Education? The public doesn’t agree on the answer. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http://neatoday.org/2016/08/29/the-purpose-of-education-pdk-poll/

  • This article discusses the results of the yearly public poll and highlights there is no ‘one’ opinion on the purpose of education. 

6. Lumen Learning. Four Basic Purposes of School. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/foundationsofedx81xmaster/chapter/four-basic-purposes-of-school/

  •  A brief article introducing the four basic purposes of education.    

7. What is the Purpose of Education? (2012) [Infographic] Retrieved March 1, 2018  https://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_update/eu201207_infographic.pdf

  • This infographic shows how the purpose of education in the US has changed in modern times.

8. (2013, June 30). The Historical Foundations of Education. [pdf] Retrieved February 23, 2018, from https://www.slideshare.net/martianne21/historical-foundations-of-education-theorist-and-philosophers?qid=237dcb79-9451-4766-a9a4-e546fc480ec9&v=&b=&from_search=8

  • Read slides 1-12 from Evangelista, Yanne. This resource provides a historical overview of the history of education (globally).

History of US Educational system:

This section will provide you with an understanding of the history of the American educational system and the Common School Movement. The Common School Movement is considered one of the pillars of Western education.

9. Gray, P. (2008, August 20). A Brief History of Education. Retrieved February 23, 2018, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freedom-learn/200808/brief-history-education

  •  Dr. Gray discusses the history of education and states schools are the product of history.

10. Graham, P. A. (2005). Introduction. In Schooling America: how the public schools meet the nation's changing needs. (14-20) Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

  • The introduction to this book gives a thoughtful overview of the changing purposes of American education. 
  • You will need to create an account with Proquest eBook Central to access this resource. Once you are logged into Proquest, search for Schooling America: how the public schools meet the nation's changing needsYou will also need to download and install Adobe Digital Editions to download the eBook. You can access this for 21 days. This chapter provides you an in-depth discussion of educational philosophies.

The Common School Movement and John Dewey and his influence:

11. Jeynes, W. (2012). The Widespread Growth of the Common School and Higher Education. In American Educational History. (145-156) Retrieved March 19, 2018, from https://www.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/13715_Chapter6.pdf

  • Read pages 145-156 to gain a deeper understanding of the Common School movement and its purposes, educational reformers and perspectives of who those who opposed the Common school system.

John Dewey and his influence:

John Dewey had a profound and lasting impact on education. This section will introduce you to his theories of education and analyze his view of the purposes of education from a variety of perspectives.

12. Talebi, Kandan. (2015, September) John Dewey- Philosopher and Educational Reformer. European Journal of Educational Studies. [pdf] Retrieved February 28, 2018 from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED564712.pdf

  • This chapter provides an in-depth discussion of John Dewey and his impact on American education.

13. Kintz, A. I. (n.d.). What is the Purpose of Education? Dewey's challenge to his contemporaries. [pdf] Retrieved March 01, 2018, fromhttps://www.academia.edu/23693775/What_is_the_Purpose_of_Education_Deweys_challenge_to_his_contemporaries

  •  This chapter provides a more in-depth discussion of Dewey’s views of the purpose of education and how it related to other philosopher’s views.

The IB Learner Profile

14. IBO. (2013). The IB Learner Profile. Retrieved from https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/fd82f70643ef4086b7d3f292cc214962/learner-profile-en.pdf

  • This is a one-page document that describes each of the 10 attributes of the IB Learner.

15. IBO. (n.d). About the IB. Retrieved from https://www.ibo.org/about-the-ib/

  • Take a moment to explore the IB Website and learn more about the International Baccalaureate Organization, their mission, and their educational philosophy.

Optional Videos

1. Mod-U. (2017, August 10). Why Did We Create Public Schools? [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyHy71_tkcY&list=WL&index=21  (4:48)

  • This video explains why the United States created their system of public schools.

2. Alliterative. (2017, September 04). Class, Classics & Classroom: A short history of education. [Video File] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fR0YVsr8QhU&t=25s&index=35&list=WL (14:51)   

  • This video will provide you with a brief introduction to the history of education.

3. Mod-U. (2017, September 5). Why Is Our Education System So Complex?: A Short History of Education [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfvcEu_jnyg&index=2&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VsBEsuUjWYOaPrJsFePgosY (8:29)

  •  This video provides an overview of the complex American system.

4. Mod-U. (2017, August 14). What Can Common Schools Teach Us?: A Short History of Education [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9r3Ei4RC4k&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VtPj8H97Iz2ePsF7NiixSGP   (2:12)

  • What can a school program from 150 years ago teach us today? Not only did it change our minds about what education’s role was in a modern society, but it also tried to solve policy issues that are still being debated today.

5. Mod-U. (2017, December 1). Who Were the Common School Reformers?: A Short History of Education [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejAT3EAdC5w&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VtPj8H97Iz2ePsF7NiixSGP&index=3  (4:23)

  • Who were the powerful personalities who were able to convince people around the country to adopt the Common School? Where did they come from, and what did they believe about education?

7. Mod-U. (2017, August 14). The Common School Reform Package: A Short History of Education [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEhl-tCgb78&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VtPj8H97Iz2ePsF7NiixSGP&index=4    (5:51)

  •  This video explains what the Common School reform movement was.

8. Mod-U. (2017, August 14). Successes and Failures of the Common School Movement: A Short History of Education [Video file] Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXFdRnQNZfA&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VtPj8H97Iz2ePsF7NiixSGP&index=5  (2:58)

  • The Common School Movement fundamentally changed education in America, but it was far from perfect. How did it approach race and slavery? Was it a method of social control? Think of these motives as we continue into other units.

9. Davidson Films, Inc. (2010, June 21). John Dewey's Theories on Education and Learning: An Introduction to His Life and Work. Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGjSMqwlP3E&list=PL9VM8Qq_3FrbeT9yvKNRgXOBQjwHEKOf2&index=4&t=68s (3:56)

  • This video is an introduction to John Dewey’s theories of Education

Optional Reading

1. Labaree, D. (1997). Public Goods, Private Goods: The American Struggle over Educational Goals. American Educational Research Journal, 34(1), 39-81. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/1163342

  • An intriguing perspective is offered by Professor Labaree. This could help you think about the goals of schooling in your context.

Unit 2:  Historical Global Foundations of Education

  • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

1. Open Learn. (2008, March 28). Chinese education: How do things work? Retrieved March 01, 2018, from http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/international-development/international-studies/chinese-education-how-do-things-work

  • This article provides an overview of the Chinese education system.

2. Gwanfogbe, M. B. (2012). AFRICA’S TRIPLE EDUCATION HERITAGE: A HISTORICAL COMPARISON. In Handbook of African educational theories and practices: a generative teacher education curriculum (pp. 70-85). [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http://www.thehdrc.org/Handbook%20of%20African%20Educational%20Theories%20and%20Practices.pdf

  • Read only Chapter 3, AFRICA’S TRIPLE EDUCATION HERITAGE: A HISTORICAL COMPARISON. Chapter 3 discusses the historical heritage of Africa’s educational systems.

3. Rothermund, D. (2002) India-Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. (pp. 17-20) [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018 from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403701275/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=b45fe10f

  • This article is an overview of the Indian Education System.

4. McCarthy, J. (2002) Iran-Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. (pp. 102-103) [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018 from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403701334/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=929e4434

  • This article is an overview of the Iranian Education System.

5. Kobayashi, T & D Musslewhite. (2002) Japan-Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. (pp. 217-222) [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018 from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403701419/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=f79ecce2

  • This article is an overview of the Japanese Education System.

6. Abazov, R. (2002) Philippines—Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. pp. (pp.499-502) [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018, from Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403702348/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=c21e0b75.

  • This article is an overview of the Philippine Education System.

7. Khalid, A (2002) Uzbekistan-Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. (pp. 47-49). [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018, from Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403703132/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=b68954b4

  • This article is an overview of the Uzbekistani Education System.

8. Nguyen, U. (2002) Vietnam-Education System. In Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. 2002, (pp.65-66 ) [pdf] Retrieved March 1, 2018, from Retrieved March 1, 2018 http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3403703147/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=7ea80bb0

  • This article is an overview of the Vietnamese Education System.

9. Khawajamir, M. (2016). History and Problems of Education in Afghanistan. [pdf] Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://www.shs-conferences.org/articles/shsconf/pdf/2016/04/shsconf_erpa2016_01124.pdf

  • This article discusses the history and problems facing education in Afghanistan. 

Optional Videos

1. Vidya-mitra. (2016, December 01). History of Education Policy in India. Retrieved March 02, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnWhr4KoHNo&list=WL&index=39 (24:33)

  • This video provides an in-depth history of the Indian education system.

 2. Mindbug Studios. (2012, July 19). Brief History of Education in Brazil.  Retrieved March1, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRFmmgzlu2o&index=39&list=WL (4:45)

  • This video provides an overview of the history of Brazilian education. 

Unit 3: Philosophical Foundations of Education

  • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Begin and participate in the Group Activity (Due Unit 7)
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.


1. MEANING, SCOPE & FUNCTIONS OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. (n.d.). In S. Sikhauli (Ed.), MA.Edu.Philosophy (pp. 1-13). Retrieved March 3, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/34327764/M.A._Edu._Philosophy.

  • This chapter will provide you with an understanding of the field of educational philosophy and provide a foundation for further readings.

2. Educational Philosophies Definitions and Comparison Chart With. (n.d.). [pdf] Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://ctle.hccs.edu/facultyportal/tlp/seminars/tl1071SupportiveResources/comparison_edu_philo.pdf  

  • This article compares educational philosophies and provides an informative comparison chart.

3. Sharpes, D. K. (2013). Modern Educational Philosophies. In Advanced Educational Foundations for Teachers: the history, philosophy, and culture of schooling (pp. 399-430). Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http:ebookcentral.proquest.com

  • You will need to create an account with Proquest eBook Central to access this resource. Once you are logged into Proquest, search for In Advanced Educational Foundations for Teachers: the history, philosophy, and culture of schooling. You will also need to download and install Adobe Digital Editions to download the eBook. You can access this for 21 days. This chapter provides you an in-depth discussion of educational philosophies.

4. Valbuena, J. G. (2016). Essentialism: As a philosophy and as a philosophy of education (Unpublished thesis). Philippine Normal University. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/24833960/Essentialism_As_a_Philosophy_and_As_a_Philosophy_of_Education 

  • This author discusses Essentialism as an educational philosophy.

5. Western Philosophies of Education. (n.d.). In S. Sikhauli (Ed.), MA.Edu.Philosophy (pp. 49-55). Retrieved March 3, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/34327764/M.A._Edu._Philosophy

  • This chapter will provide a more in-depth description of Western educational philosophy.

6. Labaree, D. (2005, February). Progressivism, Schools, and Schools of Education. Retrieved March 07, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/7055356/Progressivism_Schools_and_Schools_of_Education   

  • This paper provides a discussion of Progressivism.

7. Amidon, J., Monroe, A., & Ortwein, M. (n.d.). Progressive Education. Education, Society, & the K-12 Learner. Retrieved March 02, 2018, from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/teachereducationx92x1/chapter/progressive-education/

  • This article provides you with another perspective on progressive education and its effects on schooling.

8. Lynch, M. (2016, November 03). Philosophies of Education: 3 types of student-centered philosophies. Retrieved March 07, 2018, from http://www.theedadvocate.org/philosophies-education-3-types-student-centered-philosophies/

  • This article discusses which educational philosophies are student-centered.                                                                                                                                                            

9. Lynch, M. (2016, August 05). Philosophies of Education: 2 types of teacher-centered philosophies. Retrieved March 07, 2018, from http://www.theedadvocate.org/philosophies-education-2-types-teacher-centered-philosophies/

  • This article discusses which educational philosophies are teacher-centered.

10. Educational Philosophy Self-Assessment[XLSX]. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://lumen.instructure.com/courses/211470/assignments/2388018

  •  Complete and score this Educational Philosophy Self-Assessment

Optional Videos

1. Krutka, D. (2016, June 02). 5 Educational Philosophies. Retrieved February 22, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H0DbcDbIbs&t=610s&index=2&list=WL (12:09)

  • This video will reinforce what you’ve read about different educational philosophies.

2. Shook, T. (2016, November 04). Progressivism: Overview & Practical Teaching Examples. Retrieved March 03, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCLKvKuaKQo&list=PL9VM8Qq_3FrbeT9yvKNRgXOBQjwHEKOf2&index=2   (3:32)

  • This video will provide you with a recap of the principles of progressive education.

3. Rubinacci, J. (2016, July 26) Building a Better Teaching Philosophy: Studying Perennialism and Essentialism. Retrieved February 27, 2018 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwMUSBMmOnw&list=WL&index=25  (2:10) 

Unit 4: Global Philosophical Foundations in Education

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

1. Sharpes, D. K. (2013). Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Trends. In Advanced Educational Foundations for Teachers: the history, philosophy, and culture of schooling [pdf] (pp. 431-450). Retrieved March 1, 2018, from http:ebookcentral.proquest.com   

  • This chapter will introduce you to 4 philosophers from around the world and discuss their place in educational history.   
  • You will need to create an account with Proquest eBook Central to access this resource. Once you are logged into Proquest, search for In Advanced Educational Foundations for Teachers: the history, philosophy, and culture of schooling. You will also need to download and install Adobe Digital Editions to download the eBook.  

2. Qadoumi, G. (November 11). What are some examples of philosophers of education and their contributions? Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-examples-of-philosophers-of-education-and-their-contributions

  • This resource will introduce you to a variety of philosophers and their educational contributions.

3. Schools of Philosophy Graphic Organizer [Pdf]. (2014, August).Retrieved March 2, 2018, from https://lumen.instructure.com/courses/211470/files/22401734?module_item_id=5567015

  • Print and complete this Schools of Philosophy Graphic Organizer as a tool for your paper and group project

4. Stinson, D. W. (2016). Dewey, Freire, and Foucault and an ever-evolving philosophy of (mathematics) education. Journal of Research in Curriculum & Instruction, 20(2), 70–78. Retrieved fromhttps://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1038&context=mse_facpub 

  • Read sections I-V of this article for a comparison of the thoughts of Dewey, Freire, and Foucault.

5. Schor, I. (1992). Education is Politics: Paulo Freire's critical pedagogy. In Paulo Freire: A critical encounter. [pdf] (pp. 24-36). Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com

  • This chapter discusses Paulo’s Freire’s pedagogy.  
  • You will need to create an account with Proquest eBook Central to access this resource.  You can access this for 21 days.  

6. Petrovic, J. E., & Mitchell, R. M. (2018). Comparing Reflections on Philosophies of Indigenous Education around the World. In Indigenous Philosophies of Education around the World (pp. 249-263). Retrieved March 5, 2018, from www.academia.edu.35861136.Indigenous_Philosophies_of_Education_around_the_World.pdf

  • This chapter discusses how we should view different philosophies of indigenous education and poses some interesting questions.  (13 pgs)

7. Bonnie, M. (2010, April 30). Two Key Theories in Education: Confucius and John Dewey. Retrieved March 02, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/1120169/Two_Key_Theories_in_Education_Confucius_and_John_Dewey

  • This article discusses some of the similarities and differences between Confucius and Dewey, two philosophers not often grouped together.  

8. Faryadi, Q. (2015, Nov. & Dec.). An Islamic Perspective of Teaching Philosophy: A personal justification. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574266.pdf  

  • Read sections I-IX to learn more about an Islamic perspective of teaching.

    9. Qadoumi, G. (November 11). What are some examples of philosophers of education and their contributions? Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-examples-of-philosophers-of-education-and-their-contributions

                   This resource will introduce you to a variety of philosophers and their educational contributions.

    10. Schools of Philosophy Graphic Organizer [Pdf]. (2014, August).Retrieved March 2, 2018 from https://lumen.instructure.com/courses/211470/files/22401734?module_item_id=5567015

                   Print and complete this Schools of Philosophy Graphic Organizer as a tool for your paper and group project

    11. Stinson, D. W. (2016). Dewey, Freire, and Foucault and an ever-evolving philosophy of (mathematics) education. Journal of Research in Curriculum & Instruction, 20(2), 70–78. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1038&context=mse_facpub (8pg)

                   Read sections I-V of this article for a comparison of the thoughts of Dewey, Freire and Foucault.

    12. Schor, I. (1992). Education is Politics: Paulo Freire's critical pedagogy. In Paulo Freire: A critical encounter.[pdf] (pp. 24-36). Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com

                   This chapter discusses Paulo’s Freire’s pedagogy.  (14pg)

    13. Petrovic, J. E., & Mitchell, R. M. (2018). Comparing Reflections on Philosophies of Indigenous Education around the World. In Indigenous Philosophies of Education around the World (pp. 249-263). Retrieved March 5, 2018, from www.academia.edu.35861136.Indigenous_Philosophies_of_Education_around_the_World.pdf

    • This chapter discusses how we should view different philosophies of indigenous education and poses some interesting questions.  (13 pgs)

    14. Bonnie, M. (2010, April 30). Two Key Theories in Education: Confucius and John Dewey. Retrieved March 02, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/1120169/Two_Key_Theories_in_Education_Confucius_and_John_Dewey

    • This article discusses some of the similarities and differences between Confucius and Dewey, two philosophers not often grouped together.  (12 pg)

    15. Faryadi, Q. (2015, Nov. & Dec.). An Islamic Perspective of Teaching Philosophy: A personal justification. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574266.pdf (9pg)

    • Read sections I-IX to learn more about an Islamic perspective of teaching.

    Optional Videos

    1. AhChickenLittle. (2012 October 25). John Locke’s Thoughts on Education. Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaWj0qBAUPo  (4:59)

    • This video provides you with an overview of John Locke and his thoughts on education.

    3. Wiseman, A. (2013, April 18). Human Rights: Frieres (sic) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Part 1. Retrieved March 05, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6zyEiyaXA   (8:24)

    • This video walks you through the pedagogy of the oppressed theory. 

     4. AhChickenLittle. (2012 October 25). John Locke’s Thoughts on Education. Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaWj0qBAUPo  (4:59)

    •  This video provides you with an overview of John Locke and his thoughts on education.

    5. Jordan, Adam. (2016, March 3). Horace Mann’s Impact on Education. Retrieved February 25, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4Qc3gZQZpI  (6:01)

    • This video will provide you with an overview of Horace Mann as a progressive reformer.

    6. Wiseman, A. (2013, April 18). Human Rights: Frieres (sic) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Part 1. Retrieved March 05, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6zyEiyaXA   (8:24)

    • This video walks you through the pedagogy of the oppressed theory. 

    Unit 5: Sociological Foundations of Education

    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

    1. Education around the World. (n.d.). In Introduction to Sociology. Retrieved March 3, 2018, from https://cnx.org/contents/r-QzKsl_@7.23:voB0kEEh@6/Education-around-the-World

    •  This resource will provide you with an introduction to sociology and education.

    2. Theoretical Perspectives on Education. (2010). In University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing (Ed.), Sociology: Understanding and changing the social world. Retrieved March 3, 2018, from http://open.lib.umn.edu/sociology/chapter/16-2-sociological-perspectives-on-education/

    • Read this introduction to sociological theories of education.

    3. OECD. (2013, January 01). What Are the Social Benefits of Education? Retrieved March 04, 2018, from http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/what-are-the-social-benefits-of-education_5k4ddxnl39vk-en;jsessionid=9gickreg0ssr9.x-oecd-live-03

    • This publication from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) discussed benefits of education to society.

    4. Anderson-Levitt, K. M. (2005). The schoolyard gate: schooling and childhood in global perspective. Journal of Social History, 38(4), 987+. Retrieved March 4, 2018, from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A133934741/AONE?u=lirn17237&sid=AONE&xid=c28ffaf8

    • This article looks at the effects of “schooling” on societies.

    5. World Bank. (2018). Ch 1: Schooling, learning and the promise of education. In World Development Report 2018 : Learning to Realize Education's Promise. Retrieved March 2, 2018, from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28340             

    • Chapter 1 discusses the promise of education around the world.

    6. Sikhauli, S. (n.d.). Human Rights and Education. In MA.Edu.Philosophy (pp. 191-197). Retrieved March 3, 2018, from https://www.academia.edu/34327764/M.A._Edu._Philosophy.

    • Chapter 17 offers us a discussion of the concepts of education as a human right. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be outlined as a counterpoint to the forthcoming discussion of issues impacting access to a meaningful education.

    7. Murphy, L., Mufti, E., & Kassem, D. (2008). Education: Who gets what? In Education Studies: An Introduction. (pp. 115-125). McGraw-Hill. Retrieved March 3, 2018, from https://proxy.lirn.net/MuseProxyID=mp02/MuseSessionID=cd11p0zld/MuseProtocol=https/MuseHost=ebookcentral.proquest.com/MusePath/lib/univ-people-ebooks/reader.action?docID=420765&ppg=113.

    • Chapter 9 introduces us to some of the issues facing UK (and global) education today.

    8. Curtis, M. (2009). A World of Discrimination: Minorities, indigenous peoples, and education. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from http://minorityrights.org/wp-content/uploads/old-site-downloads/download-655-A-world-of-discrimination.pdf

    • Mr. Curtis discusses many of the issues facing minorities and indigenous peoples around the world.

    9. Hannum, E., Park, H., & Butler, Y. G. (Eds.). (2010). Introduction: Emerging issues for educational research in East Asia (pg 1-14) In Globalization, changing demographics, and educational challenges in East Asia. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

    Optional Videos

    1. Crash Course.  Education in Society: Crash course sociology #40. [video] (2018, January 15). Retrieved March 4, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S294zRodS_4&index=18&list=WL

    • The following video explains education from a sociological viewpoint. (11:31)

    2. Crash Course. Schools & Social Inequality: Crash Course sociology #41. [video] (2018, January 22). Retrieved March 4, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYMk3Bk08NA&list=PL9VM8Qq_3FrY6FqAr9cECYJoACmYsHBDO

    • As this video discusses, although we may have noble purposes for education, the field of education does have its issues. Although this video references the U.S., you will see similarities as we progress through Units 5 and 6.  (11:26)

    3. Mod*U. (2017, August 10) Equality vs. Excellence: A short history of education. [video] Retrieved February 22, 2018 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfPG62OGmHw&list=PL1M5TsfDV6VsBEsuUjWYOaPrJsFePgosY&index=3 (4:09)

    • This closing video discusses some of the issues the US has faced and reminds us that access does not equal access to a quality education. 

    Unit 6: Social & Political Issues

    • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Continue to participate in the Group Activity

    Reading Assignment

    To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

    1. OpenLearn. (2016, September 12). Displaced children of our time. Retrieved March 5, 2018, fromhttp://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/displaced-children-our-time

    • This article discusses some of the issues faced by refugees.

    2. UNICEF. (2015, July 31). Educate All Girls and Boys in South Asia: The Global Out-of-School Children Initiative. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ED573877&id=ED573877

    • This report discusses children out of school and includes graphic illustrations statistically demonstrating exclusion in education in South Asia

    3. Obashoro-John, O. A., & Oni, G. J. (2017). Refugee Education: The State of Nigeria’s Preparedness. Universal Journal of Educational Research,5(6), 989-994. Retrieved March 1, 2018, from https://eric.ed.gov/?q=EJ1143768&id=EJ1143768 doi:10.13189/ujer.2017.050611

    • This article discusses Nigeria’s educational systems’ ability to deal with the recent refugee crisis.  

    4. Hos, R. (2016). Education in Emergencies: Case of a Community School for Syrian Refugees. European Journal of Educational Research,5(2), 53-60. doi:10.12973/eu-jer.5.2.53.  Retrieved from: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099651.pdf

    • Syria too struggles with educating refugees.  

    5. In the Czech Republic, Romani Children Do Not Have Equal Access to Education. (2012). In D. A. Henningfeld (Ed.), Global Viewpoints. Education (pp. 34-41). Detroit: Greenhaven Press. Retrieved fromhttp://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1756200011/GVRL?u=lirn17237&sid=GVRL&xid=03ee5fd3

    • This article discusses how Romani children are excluded from many educational opportunities.  

    6. Wilson, W. J. (2011). Being Poor, Black and American: The impact of political, economic and cultural forces. Retrieved March 4, 2018, from https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/periodicals/Wilson.pdf

    • Read pages 1-23 for a perspective of the educational legacy of African Americans in the United States. This article highlights that even ‘advanced’ societies still have inequitable educational systems.

    7. Satyarthi, K. (2017, August 03). Free children from chains: India and the world need a multi-dimensional strategy to stop human trafficking. Retrieved March 1, 2018, fromhttps://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/toi-edit-page/free-children-from-chains-india-and-the-world-need-a-multi-dimensional-strategy-to-stop-human-trafficking/

    • This article discusses a social issue affecting children’s’ ability to access education that is rarely discussed.

    8. Winthrop, R., Dews, F., & Finan, B. (2017, October 11). Why girls' education is the world's best investment. [podcast-video] Retrieved March 16, 2018, from https://www.brookings.edu/podcast-episode/why-girls-education-is-the-worlds-best-investment/

    • This podcast and video discuss why the education of girls’ is a meaningful investment for any society. (20:00)

    9. Goodman, R., & Kaplan, S. (n.d.). The Mantra of Meritocracy (SSIR). Retrieved March 19, 2018, fromhttps://ssir.org/articles/entry/the_mantra_of_meritocracy

    • This online article discusses many of the barriers to education. 

    10. Limaye, S. (2016). Factors influencing the Accessibility of Education for Children with Disabilities in India. Global Education Reform. 3 (3) 43-56 Retrieved March 2, 2018, fromhttps://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1115090.pdf

    • While this article discusses issues for children with disabilities in India, many of the barriers to access are in place in many countries.  

     The following Articles discuss possible reform measures that can be put in place:

    11. OCED. (2016). Education in China: A snapshot. Retrieved March 5, 2018, fromhttps://www.oecd.org/china/Education-in-China-a-snapshot.pdf                

    • Read pages 28-32 (through Reforming Curriculum) to read about some initiatives to improve education in China.

    12. Kent, D. (2015). A New Educational Perspective: The Case of Singapore. Penn GSE Perspectives on Urban Education. Retrieved March 10, 2018, from https://eric.ed.gov/?q=EJ1160443&id=EJ1160443.

    • This article discusses some of the educational reforms in Singapore.  

    13. UNESCO. (2017). A guide for ensuring inclusion and equity in education. Retrieved March 5, 2018, fromhttp://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002482/248254e.pdf

    • After reviewing the terminology on pg. 7, read pages 16-27 to discuss how we can improve access to education for individuals with disabilities around the world.  

    14. Chu, L. (2017, October 24). China's education reform. New York Times, p. (L). Retrieved fromhttp://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A511079219/GIC?u=lirn17237&xid=1cf939f4

    • This opinion piece discusses China’s educational reforms.

    15. Epstein, M., & Yuthas, K. (2012). Redefining Education in the Developing World (SSIR). Retrieved March 6, 2018, from https://ssir.org/articles/entry/redefining_education_in_the_developing_world

    • These authors provide a viewpoint on how to reform education.  

     Optional Videos

    1. Normile, D. (2017, December 08). One in three Chinese children faces an education apocalypse. An ambitious experiment hopes to save them. Retrieved March 4, 2018, fromhttp://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/09/one-three-chinese-children-faces-education-apocalypse-ambitious-experiment-hopes-save

    • This article and video (5:00) discusses issues of expectations, poverty, and differences between rural and urban educational systems.

    2. Stout, K. L. (2013, December 17). Mind the gap: China's great education divide. Retrieved March 1, 2018, fromhttps://www.cnn.com/2013/12/17/world/asia/china-education-gap-stout/

    • The following video (2:10) and article discuss the achievement gap in China.

    3. NOVA. (n.d.). School of the Future | The Achievement Gap. Retrieved March 4, 2018, fromhttps://indiana.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nvsof-sci-achievementgap/wgbh-nova-school-of-the-future-the-achievement-gap/#.Wq_WxejwY65

    • This video highlights the education gap in the United States. (4:16)

     Unit 7: Global Standings and Perspectives  

    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Complete and submit the Group Presentation

    Reading Assignment

    To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

    1. Care, E., Kim, H., Anderson, K., & Gustafsson-Wright, E. (2017, March 24). Skills for a Changing World: National Perspectives and the Global Movement. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/global-20170324-skills-for-a-changing-world.pdf

    • Read pgs 1-10 to understand some of the skills that are needed in a 21st century society and how specific countries are trying to implement reforms to address this.

    2. Ledward, C., & Hirata, D. (2011). An Overview of 21st Century Skills. Retrieved March 25, 2018, from http://www.ksbe.edu/_assets/spi/pdfs/21st_Century_Skills_Brief.pdf

    •  This summary of 21st Century Skills provides you with more information regarding each area.  

    3. P21. (2016, January). Framework for 21st Century Learning. Retrieved March 27, 2018, from http://www.p21.org/our-work/p21-framework

    • This flyer provides an overview of 21st Century skills. 

    4. UNESCO. (2015). Education for All 2000-2015: Achievements and challenges(Rep.). Retrieved March 7, 2018, from http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232205e.pdf

    • Read the Executive Summary to see which areas in education have been proved upon and challenges we still face.  

    5. Global Education Monitoring Report. (2015, April 15). Report cards for Education for All: 2000-2015. Retrieved March 6, 2018, from https://gemreportunesco.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/report-cards-for-education-for-all-2000-2015/

    •  These ‘report cards’ provide a visual summary of the full UNESCO report.

    6. World Bank. (2018). Overview: Learning to realize education’s promise. In The World Development Report 2018: LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28340

    • The overview of this report provides context for how many countries are improving their educational systems and outcomes.

    7. TES. (2016, December 06). Pisa: At-a-glance global education rankings in science, mat, s and reading. Retrieved March 6, 2018, from https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/pisa-a-glance-global-education-rankings-science-maths-and-reading

    •  This is an easy to read ranking of countries 2015 performance on the PISA.

    8. World Bank. (2018). Ch 2: The great school expansion- and those it has left behind. In The World Development Report 2018: LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/28340/9781464810961_Ch02.pdf 

    •  This chapter discusses educational outcomes for those whose educational opportunities who have improved, and those whose have not.

    9. World Bank. (2018). Ch 3: The many faces of the learning crisis. In The World Development Report 2018: LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/28340/9781464810961_Ch03.pdf  (13 pgs)

    • This chapter discusses how some of the social and political factors discussed in previous units affect learning outcomes.

    10. World Bank. (2018). Ch 5: There is no learning without prepared, motivated learners. In The World Development Report 2018: LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/28340/9781464810961_Ch05.pdf  

    • This chapter discusses how we can improve students’ readiness for learning as a society related to educational outcomes.

    11. OECD. (2012, April 01). How Pronounced Is Income Inequality Around the World - And How Can Education Help Reduce It? Retrieved March 26, 2018, from http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/how-pronounced-is-income-inequality-around-the-world-and-how-can-education-help-reduce-it_5k97krntvqtf-en;jsessionid=1rbua1q59ulq3.x-oecd-live-03

    • This article discusses how income inequality can be reduced through education. 

    12. Choi, A. (2015, December 22). What the best education systems are doing right. Retrieved March 5, 2018, from https://ideas.ted.com/what-the-best-education-systems-are-doing-right/

    • This article provides a comparison of what some countries are doing right and highlights why the United States Is not achieving.

    Additional Resources for educational outcomes:

    13. Education Policy and Data Center. (n.d.). National Education Profiles. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from https://www.epdc.org/country

    • Use this site to quickly find data regarding your chosen country. Click on the country in the right toolbar, then click on the Profiles tab under the map. You will be able to click on the National Educational Profile.

    14. World Bank. (n.d.). Education Statistics (EdStats). Retrieved March 6, 2018, from http://datatopics.worldbank.org/education/wDashboard/dqlearning

    • Use this website to see how many countries performed in math, science and literacy on a variety of international measurements. This will be helpful for your presentation. Notice that this site provides outcomes on a variety of assessments given in different subjects and areas.

    15. Education Policy and Data Center. (2016, February 29). About EPDC Learning Outcomes Data. Retrieved March 6, 2018, from https://www.epdc.org/data-about-epdc-data/about-epdc-learning-outcomes-data

    • This website shows additional international assessments If your chosen country is not included in the PISA results.

    16. US Department of Education. (2015, December). Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-20 Countries: 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2018, from https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016100.pdf

    •  Appendix A starting on page 93 provides you with information regarding various countries. 
    Optional Video

      1. TEDxTalks. (2015, August 31). What the Finnish education systems could learn from Asia. [video] Retrieved March 6, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXihBgHJelY&index=33&list=WL

      •   Listen as Hannamiina shares how Finland can learn from Asian educational systems.

      Unit 8: The Role of Educators in a Changing World

      • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
      • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
      • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
      • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment
      • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

      Reading Assignment

      To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.

      1. Costin, C. (2017, August 3). What is the Role of Teachers in Preparing Future Generations? Retrieved March 11, 2018, from https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/what-is-the-role-of-teachers-in-preparing-future-generations/

      • What will the role of teachers be in a changing world?  

      2. Andrews, D. J., Richmond, G., & Floden, R. (2018). Teacher Education for Critical Democracy: Understanding Our Commitments as Design Challenges and Opportunities. Journal of Teacher Education,69(2), 114-117. doi:10.1177/0022487117752363 retrieved from https://scholars.opb.msu.edu/en/publications/teacher-education-for-critical-democracy-understanding-our-commit

      •  This article brings us back to our discussion of what the role of educators and those interested in education is in advancing democratic and social justice ideals. 

      3. UNESCO. (2014). Advocacy Toolkit for Teachers to Provide a Quality Education. Retrieved February 19, 2018, from http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002299/229954e.pdf

      • This toolkit provides information on what educators and educational advocates can do to ensure all students received a quality education. 

      4. Pisa, K. (2017, October 05). Where teachers have the highest status. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from https://www.cnn.com/2017/10/04/health/teacher-pay-and-status/index.html

      • This article discusses some ways teachers are valued.

      5. Varkey Foundation. (n.d.). 2013 Global Teacher Status Index (Rep.). Retrieved February 11, 2018, from Varkey Foundation website: https://www.varkeyfoundation.org/sites/default/files/documents/2013GlobalTeacherStatusIndex.pdf

      • Read the executive summary (pgs 6-8) of this document to understand the purpose and findings of the Varkey Foundation’s study. You might want to see if your country is included in the country-specific findings  

      6. Varkey Foundation. (n.d.). Respect: Status of teachers. [Infographic]. Retrieved February 27, 2018, from https://www.varkeyfoundation.org/media/4188/teacher-status-index-infographics.pdf

      • This infographic is a great overview of the Varkey Foundation study of how teachers are respected around the world. 

      7. UNESCO. (2015, September). The Right to Education and the Teaching Profession (Rep. No. 8th consultation). Retrieved February 22, 2018, from UNESCO website: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002348/234820E.pdf

      • Read PART I -Analysis of Measures Reported (pgs 9-22) which addresses many areas and recommendations for ways to improve educational outcomes by improving the quality of teaching.            

      8. Benade, L. (2016) Teachers’ reflective practice in the context of twenty-first-century learning. In Open Review of Educational Research 3:1, pages 133-147. Retrieved March 27, 2018 from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23265507.2014.998159   

      • This article discusses how Teachers can become reflective practitioners within the context of 21st Century learning. 

      9. Larrivee, B. (2000). Transforming Teaching Practice: Becoming the critically reflective teacher. Reflective Practice,1(2), 293-306. Retrieved March 12, 2018, from http://ed253jcu.pbworks.com/f/Larrivee_B_2000CriticallyReflectiveTeacher.pdf

      • This article provides you with the process of becoming a reflective teacher. 

      10. Bim-Bad, B. M., & Egorova, L. I. (2016). Interaction Between Philosophy of Education and Teaching Practice. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education. 11(10), 3385-3392.Retrieved February 22, 2018, fromERIC  https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1114663.pdf

      • This article discussed how our philosophy of education is manifested in our teaching practice.  

      11. Spurgeon, L., & Moore, G. (n.d.). The Educational Philosophies of Training and Development Professors, Leaders, and Practitioners. Retrieved February 21, 2018, from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ553242.pdf

      • What is the role of our educational philosophy in instruction? Does our role matter? While this article references educational philosophies as it applies to educator education (similar to the program you are enrolled in), the chart on page 13 may be informative for your final paper.                            

       https://www.ibo.org/globalassets/digital-tookit/flyers-and-artworks/approaches-to-teaching-learning-dp-en.pdf

      Optional Videos

      1. OnSide Learning. (2013) Education-Am I a 21st Century Teacher? [video] Retrieved March 29, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCwtsAp2VyY&index=13&list=WL

      • Review this video as it discusses the P21 principles and 21st Century learning. (2:57)

      2. NOVA. (n.d.). School of the Future- What Should the School of the Future Look Like? Retrieved March 10, 2018, from https://mass.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nvsof-sci-futureschool/wgbh-nova-school-of-the-future-what-should-the-school-of-the-future-look-like/#.Wr13LIjwY64

      • What will the school of the future be like? How is this aligned with the IB principles?

      Additional resources:

      3. University of the People. (n.d.). Learning to teach: Becoming a reflective practitioner. Retrieved March 30, 2018, from http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-becoming-reflective-practitioner/content-section-0?active-tab=description-tab

      • If you want to learn more about becoming a reflective practitioner, this 5-hour free course is available. 

      Course Requirements:

      Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
      Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating (out of a 10 point scale) are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

      Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
      Most units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment, which may come in many forms (case study, research paper, etc.). You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

      Group Activities
      During this course, you will be required to complete work as part of a small group. Group work is an important component of your coursework, as it allows you to deepen relationships with classmates, and gain a more thorough understanding of the topics presented in this course. Further, group work mimics the business environment in which projects are often conducted in small teams across different departments. You will be randomly assigned to your groups and are expected to work with your teammates throughout the term for all group activities.

      Reflective Portfolio Activities
      Portfolio Activities are tools for self-reflection and evaluation within the context of the course. These activities are designed as a means to document and critically reflect upon your learning process. Activities you develop for this course will be kept in your Research and Practice Portfolio and will be important as you progress towards the final courses in your program, particularly the Advanced Practice and Capstone courses.  Ideally, you will draw from your coursework and experiences, as well as what you’ve learned in other courses, and your own current teaching practice to showcase your overall growth and examine ways in which you can continue to develop and sharpen your research interests and expand your cadre of instructional methods.

      The Research and Practice Portfolio 
      Throughout the M.Ed. Program, you will be building a portfolio of instructional strategies and materials, and acquiring knowledge and skills for advanced professional practice.  Students begin building their portfolio right from start.  It serves as a repository for research findings and sample units and lessons.  Students use it to archive ideas and resources related to instructional methods, classroom management, and assessment.  The portfolio supports your own self-reflection on changes that demonstrate growth in professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes that is part of the Capstone experience.    The component parts of the Research and Practice Portfolio include:

      • Reflective Portfolio Activities
      • Research
      • Teaching and Learning Resources

      Course Forum
      The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


      Course Policies:

      Grading Components and Weights
      Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

      Discussion Assignments  20%
      Written Assignments    30%
      Group Activities  25%
      Reflective Portfolio Activities  25%
      TOTAL 100%


      Grading Scale
      This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

      Letter Grade
      Grade Scale Grade Points
      A+ 98-100 4.00
      A 93-97 4.00
      A- 90-92 3.67
      B+ 88-89 3.33
      B 83-87 3.00
      B- 80-82 2.67
      C+ 78-79 2.33
      C 73-77 2.00
      C- 70-72 0.00
      D+ 68-69 0.00
      D 63-67 0.00
      D- 60-62 0.00
      F Under 60 0.00
      CR N/A N/A
      NC N/A N/A
      NF N/A N/A
      W N/A N/A


      Grade Appeal

      If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within 14 days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

      Participation
      Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

      • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
      • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
      • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
      • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

      Academic Honesty and Integrity
      When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

      Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several styles and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

      Code of Conduct
      University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.