UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Master of Education in Advanced Teaching (M.Ed.)

EDUC 5711 Teaching for Diverse and Inclusive Classrooms

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EDUC 5711: Teaching for Diverse and Inclusive Classrooms


Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  EDUC 5210, EDUC 5220, and EDUC 5240


Course Description: This course will focus on creating an equitable learning environment that sensitively approaches differences.  Emphasis will be on considering decisions about curriculum, instructional materials, learning activities, and student groupings in the multicultural, multilingual classroom.  The use of adaptive technology, learning analytics and personalized learning, compensatory and remedial methods, and inquiry-based procedures to teach content to students with academic and/or behavioral difficulties will be discussed.


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

To access some of the learning resources, you must log into Moodle and go to Resources and then to the UoPeople Library and Resource Center. From there click Access to Library and Information Resource Network in order to get into LIRN. Once you are in LIRN, Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc.). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. 

For more information on navigating the UoPeople Library resources review the Library and Information Resources Network (LIRN) and JSTOR instructional document. If you have any problems, please contact library@uopeople.edu.  


Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Utilize and apply cultural theory concepts to educational institutions to ensure equitable access to learning environments and inclusive practices.
  2. Design and adapt curriculum components and instructional settings in the multicultural, multilingual learning environment to promote and enhance cultural awareness and sensitivity.
  3. Develop and implement technology-enhanced learning opportunities, in consideration of the individual needs of each student, to include adaptive and assistive technologies.
  4. Assess and analyze learner needs in diverse and inclusive settings through inquiry-based procedures to teach content and optimize learning.
  5. Apply research of differentiated instructional theories to facilitate inclusive education and support of cultural differences and academic and/or behavioral needs.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week.

Week 1: Unit 1 - Components of Diverse and Inclusive Classrooms

Week 2: Unit 2 - Organizing Instruction of Diverse Students

Week 3: Unit 3 - Curriculum for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

Week 4: Unit 4 - Instructional Approaches for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

Week 5: Unit 5 - Creating Lesson Plans for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

Week 6: Unit 6 - Adaptations and Groupings for Diverse Learners

Week 7: Unit 7 - Adaptive/Assistive Technology & Compensatory/Remediated Instruction 

Week 8: Unit 8 - Learner Analytics for Personalized Learning 


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.  The Learning Guides for all units open on the first day of class.  Please review all Learning Guides to access the readings, review assignments, etc. 

Unit 1: Components of Diverse and Inclusive Classrooms

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Portfolio Activity

Reading Assignment

1. Adams, D., Harris, A., & Jones, M.S. (2016). Teacher-parent collaboration for an inclusive classroom: Success for every child. Malaysian Online Journal of Educational Sciences, 4(3), 58-71. Retrieved from ERIC through LIRN.

  • This peer-reviewed journal article presents an outline of study results focused upon the collaborative efforts of parents and teachers in schools with inclusive education.

2. Anderson, A. (2018). 7 ways to create an inclusive classroom environment. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). Retrieved from http://inservice.ascd.org/7-ways-to-create-an-inclusive-classroom-environment/

  • This educational resource reviews various methods and ways for an educator to implement and create inclusive academic settings. (This would be a good resource to include in your portfolios.) Links to supporting documents, resources, and articles are included.

3. Avcioglu, H. (2017). Classroom teachers' behaviors and peers' acceptance of students in inclusive classrooms. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice, 17(2), 463-492. Retrieved from ERIC through LIRN.

  • This qualitative research study focused on information related to how teachers inclusive classroom settings react towards students with disabilities in their classrooms. Peer acceptance rates in inclusive settings is also reviewed.

4. Bray, W.S. (2005). Supporting diverse learners: Teacher collaboration in an inclusive classroom. Teaching Children Mathematics, 11(6), 324-329. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This article explores teacher reflections on the expectation of all learners to be successful in math content, no matter their background or learning level. NCTM principles are used for discussion and equity education access for all students.

5. Castro, A., Germain, E., & Gooden, M. (2018). Increasing diversity in K-12 school leadership. Policy Brief 2018-3. Retrieved from ERIC through LIRN.

  • This policy brief resource discussed how K-12 school leadership does not represent the diversity of school populations and how to incorporate overall changes.

6. Hill, M. (2017). Creating the culturally diverse classroom. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). Retrieved from http://inservice.ascd.org/creating-the-culturally-diverse-classroom/

  • This resource is an online inservice development guide from ASCD. The article provides a first-hand account and ideas to create an environment that is culturally responsive to all students.

7. Inclusive Schools Network. (2015). Together we learn better: Inclusive schools benefit all children. Retrieved from https://inclusiveschools.org/together-we-learn-better-inclusive-schools-benefit-all-children/

  • This resource discusses components of a differentiated school environment and defines an inclusive environment for diverse learners.

8. Juvonen, J., Nishina, A., & Graham, S. (2006). Ethnic diversity and perceptions of safety in urban middle schools. Psychological Science, 17(5), 393-400. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This journal article resource review student perceptions from 11 urban middle schools that have varied ethnic diversity. An interesting find in this research study presented that is supportive of inclusive and diverse educational environments is that safety in diverse settings.

9. K12 Academics. (n.d.) Inclusion Classroom. Retrieved from https://www.k12academics.com/educational-philosophy/inclusion-classroom

  • This resource reviews needed principle and practice guidelines for creating an inclusive classroom environment.

10. Lee, G. (2018). The benefits of racial diversity in the classroom. Think Inclusive. Retrieved from https://www.thinkinclusive.us/benefits-racial-diversity-classroom/

  • This article reviews how diversity in classrooms can foster higher academic achievement and better collaboration among all students.

11. Mohan, P. (2010). Learning in inclusive schools. Economic and Political Weekly, 45(46), 16-18. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This resource provides a first-hand account from a teacher in an inclusive environment as the educator shares the move to an inclusive classroom setting and how it has changed student perceptions and participation.

12. Mwangi, M. (2012). 5 benefits of diversity in a 21st-century classroom. Tides Inc. Retrieved from http://www.tidesinc.org/2012/09/30/5-benefits-of-diversity-in-a-21st-century-classroom/

  • This resource discusses the role of diversity as being more involved than just having students of different races in a school. (Please note the use of people first language.) Further discussion involves how a school environment can provide diversity and inclusion through proper planning that encourages communication and collaboration among all students.

13. National Education Association (NEA) (n.d.). Diversity toolkit introduction. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/tools/diversity-toolkit-introduction.html

  • This toolkit was created by the NEA to present the main issues regarding diversity established by the NEA and strategies to address diversity issues.

14. Seltzer, R., Frazier, M., & Ricks, I. (1995). Multiculturalism, race, and education. The Journal of Negro Education, 64(2), 124-140. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This peer-reviewed article offers insight into issues related to multiculturalism. Reading focus centers on interracial interactions, oppositions to multicultural and diverse classrooms, and some issues related to the implementation of a diverse educational setting.

15. Stewart, M.M., Crary, M., & Humberd, B.K. (2008). Teaching value in diversity: On the folly of espousing inclusion, while practicing exclusion. Academy of Management & Learning, 7(3), 374-386. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This peer-reviewed journal article reviews common practices related to teaching diversity and teaching inclusion. Strategies for inclusive and diverse settings are reviewed.

16. University of Arizona. (n.d.). Creating Inclusive Learning Environments. Retrieved from http://live-uarizona-diversity.pantheon.arizona.edu/sites/default/files/creating_inclusive_learning_environments._a_project_of_sap_di_and_oie.pdf

  • This resource provides an exhaustive series of explanations and lists relate to creating an inclusive learning environments related to several levels of education. This resource has some items related to higher education learning, but many of the concepts covered and listed are relevant to the K-12 educational settings.

Optional Video

Schwartz, I. (2015). The power of inclusive education. TEDxEastsidePrep. Retrieved from 

  • This video is a TedTalk on the classroom as a complex environment that needs management and planning to be an inclusive setting.

Unit 2: Organizing Instruction of Diverse Students

  • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Portfolio Activity

Reading Assignment

1. Bray, W. (2005). Supporting diverse learners: Teacher collaboration in an inclusive environment. Teaching Children Mathematics, 11(6), 324-329. Retrieved from JSTOR.

  • This article reviews challenges to and methods to overcome obstacles to inclusive environments for diverse students. Flexible student grouping and academic learning choices for students are reviewed.

2. Flores, R.P., Monroy, G.V., Fabela, A.M.R. (2015). Compensatory policies attending equality and inequality in Mexico educational practice among vulnerable groups in higher education. Journal of Education and Learning, 4(4), 53-63. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1097791.pdf

  • This resource presents a discussion of how social inequality exists in accessing higher education among lower socioeconomic groups and diverse populations in Mexico. 

3. Howard, E. R., & Christian, D. (2002). Two-way immersion 101: Designing and implementing a two-way immersion education program at the elementary level. Santa Cruz, CA: Center for Research, Diversity, and Excellence, University of California, Santa Cruz. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED473082.pdf

  • This resource introduces an innovative instructional approach for integrating native English speakers and non-native English speakers in inclusive classrooms. Concepts of planning and content design to meet diverse student needs are discussed.

4. McFarland-McDaniels, M. (n.d.). How to organize a classroom for diverse learners. Classroom. Retrieved from https://classroom.synonym.com/organize-classroom-diverse-learners-8235933.html

  • This online resource discusses how a teacher can organize a classroom to meet diverse learning needs. Means of identifying student learning needs are presented. Creating classroom environments that are adapted to student needs and differentiated learning centers are reviewed.

    5. Stanford, B. & Reeves, S. (2009). Making it happen: Using differentiated instruction, retrofit framework, and Universal Design for Learning. TEACHING Exceptional Children Plus, 5(6), 1-9. Retrieved from ERIC.

    • This resource reviews how the traditional classroom environment does not always work well with diverse learners. Aspects of differentiated instruction retrofit framework and Universal Design for Learning are introduced. The article offers vignettes for learning application.

    6. Taylor, B.K. (2015). Content, process, and product: Modeling differentiated instruction. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 51(1), 13-17. Retrieved from ERIC.

    • This resource discussed how differentiated instruction is an instructional strategy to meet the meets of diverse learners through their unique needs, interests, and learning styles. The focus of the article is how preservice teachers can learn to incorporate differentiated instruction by adapting content, process, and products of instruction.

    7. Tomlinson, C.A., & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction and Understanding by Design: Connecting content and kids. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Retrieved from https://chca-oh.instructure.com/files/3649/download?download_frd=1

    • Read Chapter 1. This resource provides an in-depth look at how an educator can combine elements of differentiated instruction and Understanding by Design to create and maintain an inclusive academic environment. The article reviews how to adapt learning materials to respond to student learning levels and styles. Combination of different learning techniques is discussed.

    Optional Videos
    1. Halverson, H. (2012). Educational innovation at UW-Madison: The "Backward Design" framework. Retrieved from 

    • This video resource discusses how to identify learning goals for students while working to teach what is needed. Halverson discusses how to redesign and adapt curricula components through "backward design" framework to meet student needs.

    2. Harte, H. (2015). UDL at a glance. TED-Ed. Retrieved from https://ed.ted.com/on/BvQYgiBX

    • This video explains Universal Design for Learning and aspects of UDL to implement to create inclusive environments.

    Unit 3: Curriculum for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

    • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Begin and participate in the Group Activity (Due Unit 6)
    • Complete the Portfolio Activity

    Reading Assignment

    1. Ainscow, M. & Sandill, A. (2010). Developing inclusive education systems: The role of organizational cultures and leadership. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(4), 401-416. Retrieved from Google Scholar.

    ● This resource discusses how inclusive education programming for all students in the environment can be a challenge for teachers. The paper reviews how some organizational changes can occur in inclusive environment to foster learning practices for diverse populations throughout the entire educational system. 

    2. Cummins, J. (2005). A proposal for action: Strategies for recognizing heritage language competence as a learning resource within the mainstream classroom. Modern Language Journal, 89(4) 585-592. Retrieved from JSTOR.

    ● This resource reviews how some curricula of mainstream classrooms and relates resources that can be utilized to activate student learning. The discussion is related to bilingual student instruction in public schools and academic achievement. 

    3. Devlin, M., & McKay, J. (2014). Reframing ‘the problem’: Students from low socio-economic status backgrounds transitioning to university. In Brook H., Fergie D., Maeorg M., & Michell D. (Eds.), Universities in Transition: Foregrounding Social Contexts of Knowledge in the First Year Experience (pp. 97-126). South Australia: University of Adelaide Press. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.20851/j.ctt1t304xh.8

    ● This book chapter discusses how students of lower socioeconomic backgrounds need more when leaving the secondary setting to go to college. One component heavily reviewed in his chapter is the approach of the importance of teaching and academic framing to assist the student of lower socioeconomic backgrounds in experience academic success. 

    4. Enet, E. (2004). Learning from difference: An action research guide for capturing the experience of developing inclusive education. Manchester, UK: University of Manchester. Retrieved from https://www.eenet.org.uk/resources/docs/Learning%20from%20Difference%20Guidelines.pdf

    The main focus should be on pages 18-33. This online resource is an action guide to develop inclusive education. Framework diagrams are provided for educator use. Activities and ideas to adapt curriculum are reviewed. 

    5. Florian, L., Young, K., Rouse, M. (2010). Preparing teachers for inclusive and diverse educational environments: Studying curricular reform in an initial teacher education course. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(7), 709-722. Retrieved from ERIC.

    ● This journal article is a great resource. It identifies key concepts associated with inclusive education and discusses them in relation to issues in the education reform from the perspective of teacher training. One point of interest in this article is how to work to achieve educational equity in an inclusive setting. 

    6. Keyes, C.S., Puzio, K., Jiménez, R.T. (2014). Collaborative translations: Designing bilingual instructional tools. Journal of Education, 194(2), 17-24. Retrieved from ERIC. 

    ● This resource discussed how the role of collaboration and multilingual literacy through the integration of 21st-century skills can be used to adapt curriculum for students of diverse backgrounds. 

    7. Opertti, R. & Brady, J. (2011). Developing inclusive teachers from an inclusive curricular perspective. Prospects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 41(3), 459-472. Retrieved from ERIC.

    ● This resource discusses the “Education for All” agenda related to inclusive curricula. Considerations educators need to make are outlined for an inclusive curriculum. 

    8. Ronan, B. (2018). Standards-based technology integration for emergent bilinguals. Multicultural Education. Retrieved from Gale database in LIRN. Search for the title of this article in the Gale database.

    ● This article concentrates on the challenge of a standards-based framework with technology integration for emergent bilingual students. How to adapt a standards-based framework with technology to meet diverse student learning needs is discussed. This article also has activity suggestions to assist teachers in adapting, designing, and planning lessons for a multicultural student population.

    9. Terzi, L. (2014). Reframing inclusive education: Educational equality as capability equality. Cambridge Journal of Education, 1-15. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/268284133_Reframing_inclusive_education_educational_equality_as_capability_equality 

    ● This paper seeks to encourage educators to think about how inclusive education effects and allows educational equity for diverse learners. Rethinking how schools systems are set up and are carried forth are discussed in terms of curriculum, teaching, and learning strategies. 

    Unit 4: Instructional Approaches for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

    • Peer assess Unit 3 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
    • Complete the Portfolio Activity

    Reading Assignment

    1. Cullen, K.A. (2016). Culturally responsive disciplinary literacy strategies instruction. In K. Munger (Ed.), in Steps to success: Crossing the bridge between literacy research and practice (chapter 12). United States, SUNY Online. Retrieved from https://textbooks.opensuny.org/steps-to-success/ 

    • Read chapter 12 of this textbook. The end of the chapter is of particular focus on how to apply culturally responsive teaching practices.

    2. Ebersole, M., Kanahele-Mossman, H., & Kawakami, A. (2016). Culturally responsive teaching: Examining teachers’ understandings and perspectives. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 4(2), 97-104. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1080851.pdf

    • This research study reviews a course related to ethnicity and education and how teachers perceive culturally responsive teaching. Culturally responsive teaching was recognized to be about conceptualizing culture and enhancing teaching activities.

    3. Fennell, F. (2007). Curriculum focal points: What's your focus and why? Teaching Children Mathematics, 14(5), 315–316. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/41199914.pdf?refreqid=search%3Ae83a09b7683ee625fa024eba70221e8f

    • The article helps the educator to focus on what is important in the classroom. Content is centered on defining what differentiated instruction is and the challenges that can occur with differentiated instruction. Practical methods to deal with challenges and create tasks for diverse academic need groups that are meaningful are discussed.

    4. Ginsberg, M.B. & Wlodkowski, R.J. (2009). Diversity & motivation: Culturally responsive teaching in college (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books/about/Diversity_and_Motivation.html?id=_wDcBgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q=facilitating%20equitable&f=false

    • Review and read Resource E: Facilitating equitable discussions within a multicultural classroom. This book responds to how to consistently support students across diverse student groups. There are many resources available at the end of the book which would benefit an inclusive setting.

    5. Katz, J. & Sokal, L. (2016). Universal Design for Learning as a bridge to inclusion: A qualitative report of student voices. International Journal of Whole Schooling, 12(2), 36-63. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1118092.pdf

    • This resource is a qualitative report in which the practice of inclusive education is examined from the perspective of the students involved in the learning processes. Focus is centered on how educators can be mindful of the effects of inclusive practices on students.

      6. Ohio State University. (2017). What is Inclusive Teaching? University Center for the Advancement of Teaching. Retrieved from https://ucat.osu.edu/inclusive-teaching/what-is-inclusive-teaching/

      • This resource discusses inclusive teaching practices as a range of approaches to teaching that ensures diverse needs and backgrounds of students are met in the learning environment. Inclusive teaching principles are reviewed.

      7. Samuels, A. (2018). Exploring culturally responsive pedagogy: Teachers' perspectives on fostering equitable and inclusive classrooms. SRATE Journal, 27(1), 22-30. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1166706.pdf

      • This article discusses educator perspectives on culturally responsive pedagogy. Strategies for use in the K-12 setting are reviewed.

      8. Stanford, B. & Reeves, S. (2009). Making it happen: Using differentiated instruction, retrofit framework, and Universal Design for Learning. TEACHING Exceptional Children Plus, 5(6), 1-9. Retrieved from ERIC.

      • This resource reviews how the traditional classroom environment does not always work well with diverse learners. Aspects of differentiated instruction retrofit framework, and Universal Design for Learning are introduced. The article offers vignettes for learning application.

      9. Taylor, B.K. (2015). Content, process, and product: Modeling differentiated instruction. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 51(1), 13-17. Retrieved from ERIC.

      • This resource discussed how differentiated instruction is an instructional strategy to meet the meets of diverse learners through their unique needs, interests, and learning styles. Focus of the article is how preservice teachers can learn to incorporate differentiated instruction through adapting content, process, and products of instruction.

        Infographics
        1. Association for the Supervision of Curriculum Development (ASCD). (2015). What is (and is not) differentiated instruction? Retrieved from 
        http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/publications/Differentiation_Is-IsNot_infographic.pdf

        • This infographic resource is created to define the components of differentiated instruction. Concepts that are often confused for being differentiated instruction are reviewed.

        Optional Videos

        1. Bennett-Alexander, D. (2015). Practical Diversity: Taking Inclusion from Theory to Practice. TEDxUGA. Retrieved from  . (16:52)

        • This video resource from TEDTalks discusses how inclusion, in theory, can be applied to practice. Educators can use this resource to assist in identifying personal bias(es) of their own perceptions to use to eliminate discrimination in practice.

        2. Vanderbilt University. (2017). Understanding by Design. Retrieved from   (10:51)

        • In this video resource, Educator Grant Wiggins discusses the instruction model of Understanding by Design (UbD). Discussion is focused on how to improve student achievement, clarify learning goals, create assessments for true student comprehension of instructional concepts, and generate effective learning activities.

        Unit 5: Creating Lesson Plans for Diverse and Inclusive Settings

        • Peer assess Unit 4 Written Assignment
        • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
        • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
        • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
        • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
        • Complete the Portfolio Activity

        Reading Assignment

        1. Brewer, D., Augustine, C., Zellman, G., Ryan, G., Goldman, C., Stasz, C., & Constant, L. (2007). Developing the curriculum standards and supporting their implementation. In Education for a new era: Design and implementation of K–12 education reform in Qatar (pp. 99-110). Santa Monica, CA; Arlington, VA; Pittsburgh, PA: RAND Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mg548qatar.

        • This book chapter discusses a standards-based education system and how the educator can define expectations for student learning and performance. Discussion on how to implement the standards for all students to learn and develop some learning autonomy is provided.

          2. Lloyd, G. (2008). Curriculum use while learning to teach: One student teacher's appropriation of mathematics curriculum materials. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 39(1), 63-94. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/30034888

          • This resource provides a first-hand account from one teacher within her preservice experiences. The educator reflects on how she had to adapt materials and planning to meet the needs of different groupings of students.

          3. Olinghouse, N. (2008). Designing lessons for diverse learners. Retrieved from http://education.msu.edu/te/secondary/pdf/Designing-Lessons-for-Diverse-Learners.pdf.

          • This online resource discussed in-depth how to adapt content students are exposed to, the learning process, the product students produce, and the learning environment. Steps and guidelines are provided for guidance for implementing each element. A unique table is provided with distinct learning problems with information provided on how to meet the needs of the inclusive environment and diverse students.

          4. Treahy, D., & Gurganus, S. (2010). Models for special needs students. Teaching Children Mathematics, 16(8), 484-490. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/41199522

          • This resource reviews models of instruction and classroom placement that can be used for students with special education needs. It is important to note that practices for students in special education that are discussed in this article are also useful for many students with other diverse learning needs. Inclusive classroom methods and inclusive lesson planning is discussed.

          Unit 6: Adaptations and Groupings for Diverse Learners

          • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
          • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
          • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
          • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
          • Post finalized Group Activity 
          • Complete the Portfolio Activity

          Reading Assignment

          1. Cirillo, M., Drake, C., Herbel-Eisenmann, B., & Hirsch, C. (2009). Curriculum vision and coherence: Adapting curriculum to focus on authentic mathematics. The Mathematics Teacher, 103(1), 70-75. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20876521

          • To access this resource, you must be logged into Moodle and the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) This resource discusses ways to adapt curriculum materials such as your subject textbooks. Many educators adapt curriculum materials to use in combination with the school textbook to meet student needs.

          2. Cox, J. (2015). Flexible grouping as a differentiated instruction strategy. Teach Hub. Retrieved from http://www.teachhub.com/flexible-grouping-differentiated-instruction-strategy

          • Flexible grouping is described in this resource. Use of flexible grouping arranging is described for how to use grouping techniques with differentiated instruction and to meet inclusive classroom needs.

          3. Ford, M.P. (2005). Differentiation through flexible grouping: Successfully reaching all readers. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED489510.pdf

          • Reading should be concentrated on pages 1-29 to become knowledge of the different types of groupings that can be used in reading instruction. How to use the groups effectively is reviewed in-depth.

          4. Gomez, C. L., Kurz, T.L., & Jimenez-Silva, M. (2011). Your inner English teacher. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 17(4), 238-243. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/10.5951/mathteacmiddscho.17.4.0238.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A908affbf76b2b38cf80ba3c835076dc7

          • This article provides an overview of how teachers can meet the needs of English Language Learners in the classroom by adjusting phrases and wording of instructional materials.

          5. Scanlon, D., & Baker, D. (2012). An accommodations model for the secondary inclusive classroom. Learning Disability Quarterly,35(4), 212-224. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/41702375

          • This resource provides discussion into the application and use of accommodations in inclusive classrooms. Assessments, effective practice, regular and special education teacher perspectives, and an accommodation model for best practice are reviewed.

          6. Ward, B.A. (1987). Instructional grouping in the classroom. Retrieved from https://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/InstructionalGrouping.pdf

          • This is an older resource, but it has many great ideas in it about how an educator can use different arrangements of groups in the classroom to meet student needs and increase student achievement.

          7. Cohen, R. & Barzyk, R. (2015). Adapting materials to meet your classroom needs. American English. Retrieved from https://americanenglish.state.gov/files/ae/resource_files/webinar_15.2_-_slides_for_ae.pdf

          • This webinar focuses on the aspect of finding a resource to use or a portion of a textbook that is suitable for the topic of a lesson of instruction, but not suitable to meet the needs of all students in the classroom. Adapting materials is discussed from the aspect of meeting student learning levels, context of topics, cultural awareness, and so forth. Focus should be on slides 3-51.

           Unit 7: Adaptive/Assistive Technology & Compensatory/Remediated Instruction 

          • Peer assess Unit 6 Written Assignment
          • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
          • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
          • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
          • Complete the Portfolio Activity

          Reading Assignment

          1. Adebisi, R.O., Liman, N.A., & Longpoe, P.K. (2015). Using assistive technology in teaching children with learning disabilities in the 21st century. Journal of Education and Practice, 6(24), 14-20. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078825.pdf

          • This resource paper reviews the application of assistive technology in classrooms when used with students with learning disabilities. Types of assistive technology reviewed for application are technologies designed to assist “written language, reading, listening, memory and mathematics problems.” Ideas and strategies discussed could be applied to all diverse learners to access the inclusive curriculum.

          2. Ahmad, F. H. (2015). Use of assistive technology in inclusive education. Transcience, 6(2), 62-77. Retrieved from https://www2.hu-berlin.de/transcience/Vol6_No2_62_77.pdf

          • Using assistive and adaptive technology in the inclusive classroom to meet student diversity needs is reviewed in-depth in this resource.

          3. Beecher, M. & Sweeny, S.M. (2008). Closing the achievement gap with curriculum enrichment and differentiation: One school’s story. Journal of Advanced Academics, 19(3), 502–530. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ810785.pdf

          • The article summarizes how one school reduced the achievement gap through the use of a differentiated curriculum that originated in a remedial program for students of different ethnic groups and lower socioeconomic groups. An enrichment program was initiated.

          4. Flores, R.P., Monroy, G.V., Fabela, A.M.R. (2015). Compensatory policies attending equality and inequality in Mexico educational practice among vulnerable groups in higher education. Journal of Education and Learning, 4(4), 53-63. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1097791.pdf

          • This resource presents a discussion of how social inequality exists in accessing higher education among lower socioeconomic groups and diverse populations in Mexico.

          5. Natriello, G. (2013). Adaptive Educational Technologies: Tools for Learning and for Learning about Learning. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574477.pdf

          • This resource is a National Academy of Education guide that discusses in-depth adaptive technology tool application in the public school setting and how adaptive technology enhances learning. reading should be focused upon pages 7-14.

          6. Reyes, A. (2006). Texas state compensatory education. Journal of Education Finance, 31(3), 221-237. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/40704262

          • This journal article focuses on the effects of compensatory education in Texas. Reflection of how compensatory educational practices make learning more accessible for all is a focus.

          8. Stanford, B. & Reeves, S. (2009). Making it happen: Using differentiated instruction, retrofit framework, and Universal Design for Learning. TEACHING Exceptional Children Plus, 5(6), 1-9. Retrieved from ERIC.

          • This resource reviews how the traditional classroom environment does not always work well with diverse learners. Aspects of differentiated instruction retrofit framework for meeting remedial instructional needs is reviewed.

          9. Wahl, L. & Duffield, J. (2005). Using flexible technology to meet the needs of diverse learners: What teachers can do. Knowledge Brief. WestED, pages 1-12. Retrieved from https://www.wested.org/online_pubs/kn-05-01.pdf

          • Schools are being accountable for how all students learn and responsible for all students to have access to learning materials. Assistive and adaptive technology can help meet the needs of a diverse student population.

          10. William & Mary University (W&M). (2010). Planning for technology integration to meet the needs of diverse learners. Retrieved from https://education.wm.edu/centers/ttac/documents/packets/planning_for_tech_integration_to_meet_the_needs_of_diverse_learners.pdf

          • Teachers are required to plan for inclusive classroom of diverse students. They are also required to integrate technology into their instruction. The resource provides an overview “to guide instructional planning supported by technology that is matched to outcomes and students’ learning needs.”

          Optional Videos

          1. Alberta Education. (2015). Using assistive technology to support learning. Retrieved from   (4:49)

          • This video offers is a part of a video series that discusses how to use assistive technology in the inclusive classroom setting.

          2. Woolley-Wilson, J. (2012). Blending technology and classroom learning: Jessie Woolley-Wilson at TEDxRainier. Retrieved from   (11:38)

          • Jessie Woolley-Wilson is an expert leader in technology applications for individualized learning. She discusses how technology can be applied to all students at any level of learning to become better learners.

          Unit 8: Learner Analytics for Personalized Learning 

          • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
          • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
          • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
          • Complete the Portfolio Activity
          • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

          Reading Assignment

          1. Baker, R. (2016). Using learning analytics in personalized learning. In M. Murphy, S. Redding, & J. Twyman (Eds.), Handbook on personalized learning for states, districts, and schools (pp. 165–174). Philadelphia, PA: Temple University, Center on Innovations in Learning. Retrieved from www.centeril.org

          • This chapter discusses learning analytics applied in the context of how it affects and can guide personalized learning. Some examples of success are shared, as well as occasions failures could occur. Action principles for education agencies of all levels is introduced and explained.

          2. Buckingham-Shum, S. & Crim, R.D. (2016). Learning analytics for 21st-century competencies. Journal of Learning Analytics, 3(2), 6-21. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1126768.pdf

          • This special section brings together a diverse range of learning analytics tools and techniques that can be deployed in the service of building 21st-century competencies. We introduce the research and development challenges and introduce the research and practitioner papers accepted to this section, before concluding with some brief reflections on the collection and relevance of a complex systems perspective for framing this topic.

          3. Lawrence, K.S. (2016). Identifying data-driven instructional systems. Research to Practice Brief. SWIFT Center. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED571845.pdf

          • The resource is a brief overview of the study "Creating data-driven instructional systems in school: The new instructional leadership," by Halverson, Grigg, Pritchett, and Thomas in 2015. The study reviewed investigated student outcome improvements linked to analyzing data in K-12 classrooms.

          4. Mims, W.M. & Lockley, J. (2017). Action research and differentiating reading instruction in Mississippi: Fourth-grade students' reading success. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED571755.pdf

          • A fourth-grade teacher applied research to analyze learner data in her fourth-grade classroom to make data-driven decisions about reading instruction and interventions to apply to improve reading skills for students. Inclusive instructional methods were applied using learner data analytics with inclusive reading instruction.

          5. Patrick, S., Worthen, M., Frost, D., & Gentz, S. (2016). Promising state policies for personalized learning. International Association for K-12 Online Learning. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED567893.pdf

          • This resource is a publication by the International Association for K–12 Online Learning (iNACOL). This report is written for state educational policymakers regarding policies that support personalized learning. Reading should be contained through pages 5-9 and 42.

          6. Possi, M.K. & Milinga, J.R. (2017). Learner diversity in inclusive classrooms: The interplay of language of instruction, gender and disability. Malaysian Online Journal of Educational Sciences, 5(3), 28-45. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1150435.pdf

          • This research resource reviewed the impact of data analytics in relation to student diversity in inclusive classrooms that focused on “the language of instruction, gender and disability issues, and their implications for educational practices.”

          7. Rijumol, K.C., Thangarajathi, S., &Ananthasayanam, R. (2011). Factor analytic study of cognitive processing and self-perception of learning disabilities among the elementary inclusive school children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 5(1), 32-38. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102286.pdf

          • This resource explored cognitive processing and self-perception of learning disabilities in elementary inclusive school children was reviewed.


          Course Requirements:

          Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
          Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating (out of a 10 point scale) are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

          Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
          Most units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment, which may come in many forms (case study, research paper, etc.). You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

          Group Activities
          During this course, you will be required to complete work as part of a small group. Group work is an important component of your coursework, as it allows you to deepen relationships with classmates, and gain a more thorough understanding of the topics presented in this course. Further, group work mimics the business environment in which projects are often conducted in small teams across different departments. You will be randomly assigned to your groups and are expected to work with your teammates throughout the term for all group activities.

          Portfolio Activities
          Portfolio Activities are tools for self-reflection and evaluation within the context of the course. These activities are designed as a means to document and critically reflect upon your learning process. Activities you develop for this course will be kept in your Research and Practice Portfolio and will be important as you progress towards the final courses in your program, particularly the Advanced Practice and Capstone courses.  Ideally, you will draw from your coursework and experiences, as well as what you’ve learned in other courses, and your own current teaching practice to showcase your overall growth and examine ways in which you can continue to develop and sharpen your research interests and expand your cadre of instructional methods.

          The Research and Practice Portfolio
          Throughout the M.Ed. Program, you will be building a portfolio of instructional strategies and materials, and acquiring knowledge and skills for advanced professional practice.  Students begin building their portfolio right from start.  It serves as a repository for research findings and sample units and lessons.  Students use it to archive ideas and resources related to instructional methods, classroom management, and assessment.  The portfolio supports your own self-reflection on changes that demonstrate growth in professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes that is part of the Capstone experience.    The component parts of the Research and Practice Portfolio include:

          • Reflective Portfolio Activities
          • Research
          • Teaching and Learning Resources

          Course Forum
          The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


          Course Policies:

          Grading Components and Weights
          Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

          Discussion Assignments  20%
          Written Assignments    30%
          Group Activities  25%
          Reflective Portfolio Activities  25%
          TOTAL 100%


          Grading Scale
          This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

          Letter Grade
          Grade Scale Grade Points
          A+ 98-100 4.00
          A 93-97 4.00
          A- 90-92 3.67
          B+ 88-89 3.33
          B 83-87 3.00
          B- 80-82 2.67
          C+ 78-79 2.33
          C 73-77 2.00
          C- 70-72 0.00
          D+ 68-69 0.00
          D 63-67 0.00
          D- 60-62 0.00
          F Under 60 0.00
          CR N/A N/A
          NC N/A N/A
          NF N/A N/A
          W N/A N/A


          Grade Appeal

          If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

          Participation
          Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

          • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
          • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
          • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
          • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

          Academic Honesty and Integrity
          When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

          Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several styles and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

          Code of Conduct
          University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.