UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Health Science

CPH 3814 Introduction to Communities That Care (CTC)

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CPH 3814: Introduction to Communities That Care (CTC)


Prerequisites: None.


Course Description: Communities That Care (CTC) is an evidence-based practice for preventing and reducing population-wide levels of public health problems such as crime, disease, and poverty (CDP). CDP is responsible for the rates of morbidity and mortality in every community in the world. The CTC uses a public health approach to address community-wide health and behavioral issues and this course provides students with the basic knowledge needed to help create and sustain CTC awareness. The course also examines the functions and structures of the communities and covers the five implementation phases of the CTC model which involves understanding the concept and role of key leaders and community work-groups.


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week, as well as the link below.

Some of the materials in this course can be found in this archive.


Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Explain how communities develop the awareness of evidence-based practices such as the CTC.
  2. Explain how to measure the awareness of effective public health models such as the CTC.
  3. Design and test a simple CTC-Awareness plan for one of your local communities or coalitions.
  4. Assess the willingness to support for CTC (WITS4CTC) in one of your communities or coalitions.
  5. Identify the free resources that can help support effective health science programs in your community.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week. The Final Exam will take place during Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople time).

Week 1: Unit 1 - Intro to Phase One of CTC: Getting Started

Week 2: Unit 2 - Intro to Phase Two of CTC: Getting Organized

Week 3: Unit 3 - Intro to Phase Three of CTC: Community Profile

Week 4: Unit 4 - Intro to Phase Four of CTC: Action Planning

Week 5: Unit 5 - Intro to Phase Five of CTC: Implement and Evaluate

Week 6: Unit 6 - The Pre-CTC Phase

Week 7: Unit 7 - The Willingness to Support for CTC (WITS4CTC) In Colleges

Week 8: Unit 8 - The Public-Private WITS4CTC In America

Week 9: Unit 9 - Course Review and Final Exam


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.

Unit 1: Intro to Phase One of CTC: Getting Started

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self Quiz
  • Take the WITS4CTC Pre-Survey

Reading Assignment



Social Development Research Group. (2017). Communities That Care (CTC). Retrieved from http://www.sdrg.org/CTCInterventions.asp

The CTC is the primary evidence-based practice (EBP) that the students will learn about throughout this course. The CTC was implemented over 20 years ago at the University of Washington and has been implemented in over 500 communities, located in various countries and continents across the globe. The CTC is a highly effective and efficient model that any community can use to reduce and prevent their public health problems such as crime, disease, and poverty.

Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2005). Investing in your community’s youth: An introduction to the Communities That Care system.

This guide gives an overview of the CTC Community-Wide approach to preventing crime, disease, and poverty. In addition research-based predictors of problem behaviors and positive youth outcomes:  risk and protective factors are discussed. 

    • Read this entire manual.

Communities That Care. (n.d.). Building protections: The social development strategy.

    Communities That Care. (n.d.). Milestones & benchmarks. 
      MacQueen, K. M., McLellan, E., Metzger, D. S., Kegeles, S., Strauss, R. P., Scotti, R., Blanchard, L., & Trotter, R. T., 2nd.(2001). What is community? An evidence-based definition for participatory public health. American Journal of Public Health, 91(12),1929-1938. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1446907/

      Definition of a community. This literature examines the functions and characteristics of a community from a public health perspective.

      Willingness to Support for Communities That Care (WITS4CTC): The WITS4CTC is a Likert survey that was developed by Dr. Sam Arungwa and tested by field experts to measure the willingness to support an evidence-based program like Communities That Care (CTC)

        Unit 2: Intro to Phase Two of CTC: Getting Organized

        • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
        • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
        • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
        • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
        • Complete an entry in  the Learning Journal
        • Take the Self-Quiz

        Reading Assignment


        Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2002). Tools for community leaders: A guidebook for getting started. 

        This manual provides information to help community leaders to adopt CTC. 

        • Read the entire 96-page manual

        Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2005). Investing in your community’s youth: An introduction to the Communities That Care system.

        This guide gives an overview of the CTC Community-Wide approach to preventing crime, disease, and poverty. In addition research-based predictors of problem behaviors and positive youth outcomes:  risk and protective factors are discussed.

        • Read page 25 about phase 2 of CTC.

        Social Development Research Group. (n.d.). Implementing the Communities That Care operating system. 

        This document provides an overview of the community training that takes place for individuals helping to implement Communities That Care (CTC) in their community. 

        • Read all 7 Pages. 

        Unit 3: Intro to Phase Three of CTC: Community Profile

        • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
        • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
        • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
        • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
        • Take the Self-Quiz

        Reading Assignment


        Communities That Care. (n.d.). Introduction.

        This manual describes the purpose of program selection for CTC implementation. In addition, this manual explains how to use the CTC Youth Survey data to select an effective program in the CTC Operating System.

        • Read the entire manual

          Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2005). Investing in your community’s youth: An introduction to the Communities That Care system.

          This guide gives an overview of the CTC Community-Wide approach to preventing crime, disease, and poverty. In addition research-based predictors of problem behaviors and positive youth outcomes:  risk and protective factors are discussed (for your review).

          • Risk and protective factors: Read pages 11-19 (including the case study on Page 19)
          • Read pages 22 and 23 (About the Youth Survey)
          • Read page 26: About phase three of CTC
          • Read about Phase 3 milestones/benchmarks: pages 29-30

          Unit 4: Intro to Phase Four of CTC: Action Planning

          • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
          • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
          • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
          • Take the Self-Quiz
          • Take the Graded Quiz

          Reading Assignment

          Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2005). Investing in your community’s youth: An introduction to the Communities That Care system.

          This guide gives an overview of the CTC Community-Wide approach to preventing crime, disease, and poverty. In addition research-based predictors of problem behaviors and positive youth outcomes:  risk and protective factors are discussed.

            • Read pages: 16-18, 20, 22, 27; Read about Phase 4 milestones/benchmarks: 29-31

            Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2002). Tools for community leaders: A guidebook for getting started. 

            This article provides information to help community leaders adopt CTC.

            • Read pages: 60 and 61
              National Institute of Justice. (n.d.). All programs & practices. Retrieved from https://crimesolutions.gov/Programs.aspx

              Review this evidence-based program directory
                Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development. (n.d.).  Retrieved from https://www.blueprintsprograms.org/program-search/

                Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development provides a registry of evidence-based positive youth development programs designed to promote the health and well-being of children and teens. Blueprints programs are family, school, and community-based and target all levels of need — from broad prevention programs that promote positive behaviors while decreasing negative behaviors to highly-targeted programs for at-risk children and troubled teens that get them back on track (Blueprints Programs, 2015).

                • Review this evidence-based program directory
                World Health Organization. (2018, June 1). Noncommunicable diseases. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/noncommunicable-diseases

                This article discusses noncommunicable diseases, which CTC can prevent, that kill over 40 million people every year 

                Unit 5: Intro to Phase Five of CTC: Implement and Evaluate

                • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
                • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
                • Take the Self-Quiz

                Reading Assignment


                Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2005). Investing in your community’s youth: An introduction to the Communities That Care system.

                This guide gives an overview of the CTC Community-Wide approach to preventing crime, disease, and poverty. In addition research-based predictors of problem behaviors and positive youth outcomes:  risk and protective factors are discussed.

                • Read pages: 28
                • Read about Phase 5 milestones/benchmarks: pages 29, 30, 31

                Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2002). Tools for community leaders: A guidebook for getting started. 

                • Read pages 62 and 63; 66 (vocabulary)
                Kuklinski, M. R., Briney, J. S., Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2012). Cost-benefit analysis of communities that care outcomes at eighth grade. Prevention Science: The Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research13(2), 150–161. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3305832/.

                Shirky, C. (2010, June). How cognitive surplus will change the world (transcript of the TED talk).  Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_cognitive_surplus_will_change_the_world.

                Optional Readings: 

                Communities That Care. (n.d.). Community plan implementation training: Module 1.

                Communities That Care. (n.d.). Funding the community action plan: Module 2.

                Communities That Care. (n.d.). Ensuring high-fidelity implementation: Module 3.

                Communities That Care. (n.d.). Evaluating participant outcomes: Module 4.

                Communities That Care. (n.d.). Next steps: Module 5.

                Catalano, R. F., Fagan, A. A., Gavin, L. E., Greenberg, M. T., Irwin, C. E., Jr, Ross, D. A., & Shek, D. T. (2012). Worldwide application of prevention science in adolescent health. Lancet (London, England)379(9826), 1653–1664. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398056/.

                Unit 6: The Pre-CTC Phase

                • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
                • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
                • Take the Self-Quiz

                Reading Assignment



                Arungwa, S. C. (2014). The willingness to support evidence-based juvenile delinquency prevention programs: An empirical survey of college-educated-adults for Communities That Care (Doctoral Dissertation).

                Heffernan, M. (2013, March). The dangers of willful blindness (transcript of the TED talk). Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/margaret_heffernan_the_dangers_of_willful_blindness?language=en.

                Heffernan argues that the biggest threats and dangers we face are the ones we don’t see – not because, they’re secret or invisible, but because we’re willfully blind.

                Hawkins, J. D., Jenson, J. M., Catalano, R., Fraser, M. W., Botvin, G. J., Shapiro, V., Brown, C. H., Beardslee, W., Brent, D., Leslie, L. K., Rotheram-Borus, M. J., Shea, P., Shih, A., Anthony, E., Haggerty, K. P., Bender, K., Gorman-Smith, D., Casey, E., & Stone, S. (2015). Unleashing the power of prevention. NAM Perspectives. Discussion Paper, National Academy of Medicine, Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://nam.edu/perspectives-2015-unleashing-the-power-of-prevention/

                Examples of CTC-Policy documents. CTC-Resolutions can be passed in any organization to show their WITS4CTC. These are examples of some of the first CTC-Resolutions that were signed in the state of Texas.

                • Waller County. (2014, July 16). Resolution to declare support for Waller County Communities That Care.
                • City of Prairie View. (2014, January 27). Resolution 12162014 B.
                • City of Hempstead. (2015. ). Resolution to declare support for Communities That Care (CTC) for the City of Hempstead.
                  Hawkins, J. D., & Catalano, R. F. (2002). Tools for community leaders: A guidebook for getting started.

                  This article provides information to help community leaders to adopt CTC.
                  • Read pages 6-7 to understand the role of a CTC-Catalyst
                  • Read pages 9-10 to learn about the role of a CTC-Champion

                   Unit 7: The Willingness to Support for CTC (WITS4CTC) In Colleges

                  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
                  • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
                  • Take the Self-Quiz
                  • Take the Graded Quiz

                  Reading Assignment



                  Arungwa, S. (2015). Community-wide awareness of juvenile justice best-practices and CTC in Texas. Journal of Knowledge and Best Practices in Juvenile Justice and Psychology, 8(1), 23-33. 

                  This article covers the critical need for college-wide support of best practices, such as Communities That Care. In addition, a review and application of the original dissertation work by Dr. Sam about  WITS4CTC in colleges is provided.
                  • Read the entire article
                  Arungwa, S. (n.d.). Presentation for college leaders.

                  This presentation is provided to college leaders to show how they can support best practices, like CTC. In addition, a review of resources colleges already have is provided.

                    The following unit resources display how colleges are supporting best practices such as CTC, see the PDF’s for each college.

                    1. University of Washington. (2017). SDRG interventions. Retrieved from http://www.sdrg.org/interventions.asp
                    2. University of Utah. (n.d.). College of Health. Retrieved from https://health.utah.edu/
                    3. University of Colorado Boulder. (n.d.). Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence. Retrieved from https://cspv.colorado.edu/
                    4. EPISCenter. (2015). Communities That Care. PennState. Retrieved from http://www.episcenter.psu.edu/ctc
                      1. EPISCenter. (n.d.). An introduction to Communities That Care (CTC). Retrieved from http://www.episcenter.psu.edu/sites/default/files/Fact%20Sheet%20-%20Intro%20to%20CTC.pdf. A fact that provides data on CTC efforts in Pennsylvania/Penn State.

                    Unit 8: The Public-Private WITS4CTC In America

                    • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
                    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
                    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
                    • Complete an entry in the Learning Journal
                    • Take the WITS4CTC Post-Survey
                    • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation
                    • Read the Unit 9 Learning Guide carefully for instructions on the Final Exam
                    • Take the Review Quiz

                    Reading Assignment

                    Arungwa, S. (2015). A review of public and private CTC-support in America. Download the pdf. This brief lecture by Dr. Sam Arungwa provides an overview of government and private support for CTC.

                      ELI Magazine. (2012, February). Yale and Coca-Cola go the last mile. This article is an example of how universities and colleges can collaborate to solve pressing issues.

                      Grants.gov. (n.d.). About Grants.gov. Retrieved from https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/support/about-grants-gov.html. This site provides an overview of the U.S. Government’s 2002 initiative to house grants in a central location.

                      Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (n.d.). Grants and grant programs. Retrieved from https://www.rwjf.org/en/how-we-work/grants-and-grant-programs.html. This foundation is an example of private that provides funding support for evidence-based projects like Communities That Care (CTC).

                      Department of Justice. (2014). Funding highlights. This brief article highlights the Department of Justice’s contributions to best practices in crime, disease, and poverty prevention.

                      Unit 9: Course Review and Final Exam

                      • Read the Learning Guide and take the Review Quiz, if you haven't already done so
                      • Prepare for, take, and submit the Final Exam
                      • The Final Exam will take place during the Thursday and Sunday of Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople time); exact dates, times, and other details will be provided accordingly by your instructor

                      Course Requirements:

                      Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
                      Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

                      Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
                      Some units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment. You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

                      Learning Journals
                      Your instructor may choose to assign specific topics and/or relevant questions as a weekly Learning Journal entry for you to complete, but you are still encouraged to also use it to document your activities, record questions/problems you may have encountered, reflect on the learning process, and draft answers for other course assignments. The Learning Journal must be updated on a weekly basis because its entries will be assessed by your instructor directly as a part of your final grade. The Learning Journal will only be seen by your instructor.

                      Quizzes
                      This course will contain three types of quizzes – the Self-Quiz, the Graded Quiz, and the Review Quiz. These quizzes may contain multiple-choice, true/false, or short answer questions. The results of the Self-Quiz will not count towards your final grade. However, it is highly recommended that you complete the Self-Quiz to ensure that you have adequately understood the course materials. Along with the Reading Assignments, the results of the Self-Quiz should be used as part of an iterative learning process, to thoroughly cover and test your understanding of course material. You should use the results of your Self-Quiz as a guide to go back and review relevant sections of the Reading Assignments. Likewise, the Review Quiz will not count towards your final grade, but should also be used to assist you in a comprehensive review and full understanding of all course material, in preparation for your Final Exam. Lastly, the results of the Graded Quiz will count towards your final grade. Specific instructions on the format and content of the Graded Quiz will be provided by your instructor.

                      Final Exam
                      The Final Exam will take place during the Thursday and Sunday of Week/Unit 9, following the completion of eight units of work. The format of the Final Exam is similar to that of the quizzes and may contain a combination of different question types. You will have one attempt to take the exam, and it will be graded electronically. Specific instructions on how to prepare for and take the exam will be provided during Week/Unit 8.

                      Course Forum

                      The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


                      Course Policies:

                      Grading Components and Weights
                      Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

                      Discussion Assignments15%
                      Written Assignments 20%
                      Learning Journals 15%
                      Two Graded Quizzes (2 @ 10%) 20%
                      Final Exam 30%
                      TOTAL 100%


                      Grading Scale
                      This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

                      Letter Grade
                      Grade Scale Grade Points
                      A+ 98-100 4.00
                      A 93-97 4.00
                      A- 90-92 3.67
                      B+ 88-89 3.33
                      B 83-87 3.00
                      B- 80-82 2.67
                      C+ 78-79 2.33
                      C 73-77 2.00
                      C- 70-72 1.67
                      D+ 68-69 1.33
                      D 63-67 1.00
                      D- 60-62 0.67
                      F Under 60 0.00


                      Grade Appeal

                      If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

                      Participation
                      Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

                      • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
                      • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
                      • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
                      • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

                      Academic Honesty and Integrity
                      When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the university or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

                      Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several style and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_style_introduction.html

                      Code of Conduct
                      University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.