UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Master of Education in Advanced Teaching (M.Ed.)

EDUC 5810 Living and Learning Globally

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EDUC 5810: Living and Learning Globally


Credits: 3

Prerequisites: EDUC 5710: Understanding Barriers to Learning

Recommended: 


Course Description:

This course will focus on exploring the global competence that students need to thrive in today's increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world. It will focus on creating learning environments and opportunities that value the world as the broadest context for learning, ensuring that students are exposed to real world questions and concerns both within and beyond their local contexts. There will be consideration of ways that teachers can foster students' awareness of and engagement with global issues, develop open-mindedness to the perspectives of others and encourage reflection on their role as active and engaged global citizens. There will also be discussion of how language acquisition and multilingualism can provide particularly rich opportunities for the development of intercultural understanding and of an appreciation of different languages, cultures, and worldviews


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource, into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.


Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Articulate a clear conceptual understanding of global competence in order to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate one’s own instruction and instructional programs that intentionally integrates issues of global significance in classroom learning
  2. Demonstrate the disposition and capacity to understand and act on issues of global significance as well as the attributes of global competence (core concepts, values and attitudes, skills, and behaviors) to find ways to foster them in students to become globally competent by nourishing critical thinking, and expanding their understanding of the world around them.
  3. Examines how language acquisition and multilingualism can provide rich opportunities for the development of intercultural understanding and utilize students’ different worldviews as assets in classroom learning.
  4. Examine the purposes and quality indicators of assessment (a range of informal and formal assessments) as they relate to living and learning globally, and how to use results to plan instruction.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to plan and provide instruction that systematically integrates language and content/culture based on the evaluation of student’s language proficiency and social or academic needs by designing an instructional unit that reflects the needs of students in the selected setting.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week.

Week 1: Unit 1 - Overview of the concepts and practices of global competence, including sociocultural issues and diversity

Week 2: Unit 2 - Overview of the concepts and practices of global competence, including sociocultural issues and diversity

Week 3: Unit 3 - Inquiry into the Global World: Global issues, critical questions, and social justice

Week 4: Unit 4 - Issues of Global Competence Assessment, Advocacy and Life-Long Learning

Week 5: Unit 5 - Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, Accommodation, and Support

Week 6: Unit 6 - Issues of identity and belonging in a Global Community and Implications for Educating CLD Learners in Our Schools

Week 7: Unit 7 - Innovations in Schools: What are the Elements of a Globally-Oriented School or Classroom?

Week 8: Unit 8 - Teachers as Reflective Learners, Educational Leaders, Decision Makers and Change Agents

Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.

Unit 1: Overview of the concepts and practices of global competence, including sociocultural issues and diversity

  • Introduce yourself in the Course Forum
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Aydin, H, Ozfidan, B, Carothers, D. (2017). Meeting the Challenges of Curriculum and Instruction in School Settings in the United States. Journal of Social Studies Education Research, 8 (3), 76-92. Retrieved from http://dergipark.gov.tr/jsser/issue/32449/360844

  • The article explores the impact of unprecedented demographic changes on the curriculum and instruction provided in U.S. schools, as well as other factors that are also influencing curriculum and instruction including 1) policy changes, 2) emerging new technologies, 3) globalization, and 4) the refugee and immigration issue. The article also examines pertinent challenges needed to be addressed for both school settings and teacher educators.

    2. Evans, M., Montemurro, D., Gambhir, M., & Broad, K. (Eds.).  (2014). Inquiry into Practice: Learning and Teaching Global Matters in Local Classrooms.  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE). Retrieved from: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/oise/UserFiles/File/TEACHING_GLOBAL_MATTERS_FINAL_ONLINE.pdf

    • Read pages 3-19 from Educator Perspectives,. This Inquiry into Practice publication, Learning and Teaching Global Matters in Local Classrooms, is the most recent addition to the series. It examines and shares varied perspectives, curricula, instructional practices, and resources intended to enhance student learning related to the infusion of global and international dimensions of education into classroom and school-wide teaching and learning. It is organized into three sections: Educator Perspectives, Inquiry into Practice, and Resources. In this introduction, we briefly discuss how the text is organized, common themes that emerged across the sections, and concluding reflections.

    3. Robinson WI (2007) Theories of globalization. In: Ritzer G (ed.) Blackwell Companion to Globalization. Oxford: Blackwell. Retrieved from https://cloudfront.escholarship.org/dist/prd/content/qt9c21h2pv/qt9c21h2pv.pdf

    • This article is intended as an appraisal of Wallerstein’s œuvre in the context of the debate on global transformations in the late 20th and early 21st centuries and from the vantage point of the present author’s own critical globalization perspective. The first three parts summarize and assess Wallerstein’s theoretical system and his many contributions to macro, historical and comparative sociology, to development studies and international political economy. The fourth discusses Wallerstein’s assessment of the evolution of the world capitalist system in recent decades, including his views on the concept of globalization, and the fifth focuses on earlier and more recent critical appraisals of his work, including the present author’s own, in light of the recent transformations in world capitalism identified with globalization.

    4. Teacher Guide, K-12 Global Competence Grade-Level Indicators, Partnership for 21st Skills, Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/Global_Education/P21_K-12_Global_Ed_Indicators.pdf

    • Global competence is critical for innovation in the 21st century. Educational approaches sensitive to our changing world infuse global awareness and cultural understanding into everyday classroom practices, while also utilizing the technological resources available to teachers and students today. These global competence indicators were created by VIF International Education in order to provide grade-level frameworks for integrating global awareness into classroom practices. In combination with professional development and curricular resources, global competence indicators support teachers in creating classrooms that are open to the world. 

    Unit 2: Overview of the concepts and practices of global competence, including sociocultural issues and diversity

    • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. Butler, F. (1978). The Concept of Competence: An Operational Definition. Educational Technology, 18(1), 7-18. Retrieved fromhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/44418395.   

    • You must log into Moodle and navigate to the link Resources link at the top of the page to access this material from JSTOR. Click on the JSTOR icon and search for the article.
    • This article is concerned with the meaning of the word competence itself, the role of educational technology, and a functional relationship between them.

    2. Globalization in Education: Process and Discourse, Jürgen Schriewer. Policy Futures in Education, Vol 1, Issue 2, pp. 271 – 283 First Published June 1, 2003. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.2304/pfie.2003.1.2.6

    • The article draws on comparative analyses meant to investigate both the degree and the dimensions of the ‘internationalization’ of educational knowledge in societies that differ considerably in terms of civilizational background and modernization path.

    3. Leading for Global Competency, Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept09/vol67/num01/Leading-for-Global-Competency.aspx

    • This article states that the purpose of schooling is to prepare students for life in the real world in their communities and societies, both in the present—while students are in school—and in the future—after they leave school behind.

    4. Mansilla, V. B., & Jackson, A. (2013). Educating for Global Competence: Learning Redefined for an   Interconnected World. In H. Jacobs (Ed.), Mastering Global Literacy (5-27). New York: Solution Tree. Retrieved from http://pz.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/Educating%20for%20Global%20Competence%20Short%20HHJ.pdf

    • This article points out that to succeed in this new global age, our students will need capacities that include but go beyond reading, mathematics and science – they will need to be far more knowledgeable and curious about world regions and global issues, attuned to diverse perspectives, able to communicate across cultures and in other languages, and disposed to acting toward the common good.

    5. Mansilla, V., & Jackson, A. (2011). Educating for global competence. New York, NY: Asia Society. Retrieved from https://asiasociety.org/files/book-globalcompetence.pdf  

    • Read Chapters I & VII. This document introduces a definition of global competence that is the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance.

    6. Global Competence matrix. Retrieved from https://static1.squarespace.com/static/541b08ace4b03814779bda86/t/5425b0ade4b0a13786495f02/1411756205854/World+Savvy+Global+Competence+Matrix+2014.pdf

    • Global competence is the disposition and capacity to understand and act on issues of global significance. The article discusses qualities, characteristics, and abilities the globally competent individuals possess and apply to learn about and engage with the world. Educators who aspire to help students become globally competent must both develop these attributes in themselves and find ways to foster them in students.

    7. Sinek, S. (2009). Start with why: How great leaders inspire everyone to take action. New York, N.Y.: Portfolio. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action/transcript?language=en

    • Sinek purports that great organizations seem to create their foundation by first addressing why they exist, then how they go about their mission, and then finally, What they do. The purpose here is to challenge you critically think about how you can apply these core questions of Why and How to What you do in education. 

    Unit 3: Inquiry into the Global World: Global issues, critical questions, and social justice

    • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Begin and participate in the Group Activity (Due Unit 6)
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. Boix Mansilla, V. & Jackson, A. (2011). Educating for global competence: Preparing our youth to engage the world. New York: Asia Society. Retrieved from

                   https://asiasociety.org/files/book-globalcompetence.pdf

    • Read Chapters II, III, IV, & V. This document introduces a definition of global competence that is the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance.

    2. Evans, M., Montemurro, D., Gambhir, M., & Broad, K. (Eds.).  (2014). Inquiry into Practice: Learning and Teaching Global Matters in Local

                Classrooms. Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE)

                URI:http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/oise/UserFiles/File/TEACHING_GLOBAL_MATTERS_FINAL_ONLINE.pdf

    • Read:

      • Global Citizenship and Indigenous Worldview: Strategies for K to12 Classrooms Pamela Toulouse. pg 22-25

      • Learning about Self and the World Beyond: Cultural, Religious, and Social Justice Clubs in High Schools.  pg 58-67

      • Sharing Global Classrooms: An International Experience Robert Lato. pg. 67-77

    • This Inquiry into Practice publication, Learning and Teaching Global Matters in Local Classrooms, is the most recent addition to the series. It examines and shares varied perspectives, curricula, instructional practices, and resources intended to enhance student learning related to the infusion of global and international dimensions of education into classroom and school-wide teaching and learning. It is organized in three sections: Educator Perspectives, Inquiry into Practice, and Resources. In this introduction, we briefly discuss how the text is organized, common themes that emerged across the sections, and concluding reflections.


    3. Olds, K. (2012). Global Citizenship – What are we talking about and why does it matter. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/globalhighered/global-citizenship-%E2%80%93-what-are-we-talking-about-and-why-does-it-matter

    • This article defines Global Citizenship explores the concept of Global Citizenship as a choice and a way of thinking; as self-awareness and awareness of others; as they practice cultural empathy; as the cultivation of principled decision making; and as participation in the social and political life of one's community. Also, the article poses a question of why Global Citizenship matters.


    4. McLeod, S. (2011). Ten reasons your educators are resisting your change initiative. Education Week. Retrieved from

                   http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/LeaderTalk/2011/05/10_reasons_your_educators_are.html

    • The article discusses 10 reasons educators are resisting change initiates.

    Unit 4: Issues of Global Competence Assessment, Advocacy, and Life-Long Learning

    • Peer assess Unit 3 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. Asia Society/OECD (2018), Teaching for Global Competence in a Rapidly Changing World, Asia Society, New York, URL: https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264289024-en. (pp. 10-22)

    • This new publication sets forward the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) framework for global competence developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which aligns closely with the definition developed by the Center for Global Education at Asia Society. Based on the Center’s extensive experience supporting educators in integrating global competence into their teaching, the publication also provides practical guidance and examples of how educators can embed global competence into their existing curriculum, instruction, and assessment.  

    2. Field, J. & Leicester, M. (Eds.). (2001). Lifelong Learning. London: Routledge. URL: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9781135699390

    • 'Lifelong Learning' is a hot issue for educators across the world, as societies everywhere are concerned with developing a literate, skilled and flexible workforce and to widen participation in education at all levels and for all age-groups. This book covers all the major issues, with well-known academic contributors working in the field and covering the topics of theoretical, global and curriculum perspectives, widening participation and the industrial university. With contributors from China, Africa, USA, Canada, UK and other European countries, Lifelong Learning offers a comprehensive and challenging account of issues arising from varying lifelong learning decisions, and exposes the impact these decisions have on such a large majority of the population.

    3. Kaufman, J., Hamilton, L., Stecher, B., Naftel, S., Robbins, M., Garber, C., . . . Opfer, D. (2015). What Are Teachersʹ and School Leadersʹ Major Concerns About New K–12 State Tests?: Findings from the American Teacher and American School Leader Panels. In What Are Teachers' and School Leaders' Major Concerns About New K–12 State Tests?: Findings from the American Teacher and American School Leader Panels (pp. 1-8). RAND Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt19w72c7.1

    • This text reveals that most teachers expressed moderate to major concerns about test difficulty, low student performance on the tests, and test score accuracy for special needs students.  Teachers with students taking Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) tests were more likely to be concerned about testing issues than teachers with students taking other state tests. Teachers at low-income schools were more likely to be concerned about testing issues, particularly for their English Language Arts state tests, than teachers in other schools.

    Unit 5: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, Accommodation, and Support

    • Peer assess Unit 4 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. Brisk, M. E., Barnhardt, R., Herrera, S., & Rochon, R. (2002). Educators' preparation for cultural and linguistic diversity: A call to action. Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED477737). Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED477737.pdf

    • This policy paper provides information about issues surrounding the education of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) student populations, and stresses the need for teachers who can deliver classroom practice that respects the language and culture of the child and effective, accommodative instruction that results in literacy and academic success for second language learners.

    2. Gay, G., & Kirkland, K. (2003). Developing cultural critical consciousness and self-reflection in preservice teacher education. Theory into Practice, 42(3), 181-187. Retrieved from http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.460.7961&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    • In this article, the authors argue that developing personal and professional critical consciousness about racial, cultural, and ethnic diversity should be a major component of preservice teacher education.

    3. Huddart, D. (2014). English in the Conversation of Mankind: World Englishes and Global Citizenship. In Involuntary Associations: Postcolonial Studies and World Englishes (pp. 52-74). Liverpool: Liverpool University Press. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt18kr776.6

    • The article states that English allows us to advance toward global exchange and solidarity among the institutions of civil society, extending bonds between citizens everywhere across the globe. For this reason, considering English as an international language can also bring a sense of possibility in terms of strengthening what might be called ‘planetary citizenship’, i.e. alliances among citizens with a universalist intent.  

    4. The New London Group (1996) A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures. Harvard Educational Review: April 1996, Vol. 66, No. 1, pp. 60-93. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.17763/haer.66.1.17370n67v22j160u

    • In this article, the New London Group presents a theoretical overview of the connections between the changing social environment facing students and teachers and a new approach to literacy pedagogy that they call "multiliteracies."

    Optional Videos

    1. TED Talk: Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability (excerpt attached)

                     The Danger of a Single Storyby Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie- TED Talks (excerpt attached)

    Unit 6: Issues of identity and belonging in a Global Community and Implications for Educating CLD Learners in Our Schools

    • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Post or submit finalized Group Activity 
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    Bauböck, R. (2006). Citizenship and migration – concepts and controversies. In Bauböck R. (Ed.), Migration and Citizenship: Legal Status, Rights and

                  Political Participation (pp. 15-32). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mvkf.6

    • The article discusses that migration highlights the political core and the boundaries of citizenship. You must log into Moodle and navigate to the link to access this material from JSTOR.

    Dighe, A. 2000. “Diversity in Education in an Era of Globalization.” in Learning Societies: A Reflective and Generative Framework. Edited by M. Jain. Udaipur,

                   Shikshantar: The People’s Institute for Rethinking Education and Development. Retrieved from http://www.learndev.org/dl/VS3-00q-Diversity.PDF

    • This article examines that globalization is reinforcing and perpetuating the existing unequal relationships of power and income between the advanced and developing World, and creating massive upheavals in communities. Thus, the rapid changes that are now occurring in all countries are requiring that knowledge and skills be updated continuously.

    McGavin, K. (2017). (Be)Longings: Diasporic Pacific Islanders and the meaning of home. In TAYLOR J. & LEE H. (Eds.), Mobilities of Return: Pacific

                 Perspectives (pp. 123-146). Australia: ANU Press. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt20krz1j.8

    • This article describes experiences of diasporic Pacific islanders journey “back to home” and the different consequences and impacts upon identity, sense of belonging, and ‘home’. You must log into Moodle and navigate to the link to access this material from JSTOR.

    Tavangar, H. S. (2009). Growing up global: Raising children to be at home in the world. Ballantine Books. URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=F5-HCHWkW1IC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Tavangar,+H.+S.+(2009).+Growing+up+global:+Raising+children+to+be+at+home+in+the+world.+Ballantine+Books.&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwigz6zO07DcAhUk7IMKHXc2DBYQ6AEIODAD#v=onepage&q&f=false

    • Read-xi-xvii. Introduction-Make Yourself at Home in the World. This book describes a North American family life in West Africa and explores issue of identity, self, and others in feeling at home in world.

    Veenkamp, T. (2007). People Flow revisited: Constructive management of changing patterns of migration. In Jandl M. (Ed.), Innovative Concepts for Alternative Migration Policies: Ten Innovative Approaches to the Challenges of Migration in the 21st Century (pp. 37-46). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46msqg.7

    • This is “People Flow Report” of changing patterns of migration with its opportunities and challenges.

     Unit 7: Innovations in Schools: What are the Elements of a Globally-Oriented School or Classroom?

    • Peer assess Unit 6 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. Guo, Y. (2006). Why Didn't They Show Up? Rethinking ESL Parent Involvement in K-12 Education. TESL Canada Journal, 24(1), 80 - 95. doi:https://doi.org/10.18806/tesl.v24i1.29

    • This article inquires into "Why don't they show up at school?" The absence of ESL parents from school is often misinterpreted as parents' lack of concern about their children's education. However, many ESL parents indicated that they cared passionately. Instead of assuming that ESL parents do not care, educators need to understand the barriers that hinder some parents from participating in their children's education.

    2. Juvonen, J., Le, V., Kaganoff, T., Augustine, C., & Constant, L. (2004). Whole-School Reform Models. In Focus on the Wonder Years: Challenges Facing the American Middle School (pp. 98-111). Santa Monica, CA; Arlington, VA; Pittsburgh, PA: RAND Corporation. Retrieved from https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/2004/RAND_MG139.sum.pdf

    • This text is concerned with innovations and programs designed to improve student outcomes and addresses other perceived problems at the middle school level. The following questions are addressed in this reading: (1) What are the major reform efforts at work in the middle school? (2) What are their goals and primary features? and (3) Do the reform show promise for addressing the challenges middle schools face today?

    3. Hoover‐Dempsey, K., Walker, J., Sandler, H., Whetsel, D., Green, C., Wilkins, A., & Closson, K. (2005). Why Do Parents Become Involved? Research FIndings and Implications. The Elementary School Journal, 106(2), 105-130. doi:10.1086/499194. JSTOR, JSTOR www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/499194

    • This article inquires into “Why do parents become involved in children’s education?” Based on this review, the authors offer suggestions for (1) research that may deepen understanding of parents’ motivations for involvement and (2) school and family practices that may strengthen the incidence and effectiveness of parental involvement across varied school communities.

    4. Pilegaard, M., Moroz, P., & Neergaard, H. (2010). An Auto-Ethnographic Perspective on Academic Entrepreneurship: Implications for Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Academy of Management Perspectives, 24(1), 46-61. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/25682383

    • This paper offers insight into (a) how socio spatial contexts may be structured to better evaluate the entrepreneurial facilitation process and (b) why academic entrepreneurship in the social sciences and humanities may differ from that in the hard sciences. The findings illustrate the importance of bridging innovation using twin skills to balance research and commercial goals, and the need for codifying knowledge capacities and creating new or changing existing institutional structures to legitimize and facilitate entrepreneurial activity. The research also demonstrates the great value of auto-ethnographic techniques to bring fresh insight to the study of entrepreneurship.

    Unit 8: Teachers as Reflective Learners, Educational Leaders, Decision Makers and Change Agents

    • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment
    • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

    Reading Assignment

    1. Glisson, L., McConnell, S., Palit, M., Schneiderman, J., Wiseman, C., & Yorks, L. (2014). Looking in the Mirror of Inquiry: Knowledge in Our Students and in Ourselves. Teaching & Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, 2(1), 7-20.  Retrieved fromhttps://www.jstor.org/action/doBasicSearch?Query=Looking+in+the+Mirror+of+Inquiry%3A+Knowledge+in+Our+Students+and+in+Ourselves&filter=

    • This article is based on the findings of a group of instructors at a Northeast Community College who study the concept of Collaborative Inquiry (CI) in an effort to practice this method in the classroom with their students.  The narrative shares this group’s process, the conclusions they reached, a set of reflections, and considerations that others using the CI process for professional development oriented inquiries may find useful.

    2. ASCD. (2017). How to Be a Global Thinker. Educational Leadership, 74I(4). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/dec16/vol74/num04/How-to-Be-a-Global-Thinker.aspx

    • This article suggests the routines, teachers use to cultivate classroom cultures that nurture global competence. It is stated that educating for global competence is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. and it will demand that we revisit two foundational questions: (1) What kind of learning are we actually after? and (2) How can we best nurture such learning?

    3. Fullan M. (1993). Why teachers must become change agents. Educational Leadership, 50(6). pp. 12-17. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar93/vol50/num06/Why-Teachers-Must-Become-Change-Agents.aspx

    4. Gatumu, J. C. (2011) Reflective Teaching. URI: http://oer.avu.org/handle/123456789/155

    • This module is skill oriented; in that, you must be able to undertake reflective teaching. It focuses on aspects of reflective teaching at work. It attends to the nature of reflective teaching, self evaluation, action research, peer mentoring, micro teaching and professional development.

    5. Leading for Global Competency - Educational Leadership. Retrueved from: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept09/vol67/num01/Leading-for-Global-Competency.aspx#.W0-KIXFv9f8.email

    • Now more than ever, education should prepare students for global civility and peace. So what in the world are we waiting for? This article states that good teachers and principals, in the United States and elsewhere, know that good education begins with clarity of purpose. The purpose of schooling is to prepare students for life in the real world in their communities and societies, both in the present—while students are in school—and in the future—after they leave school behind.


    Course Requirements:

    Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
    Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posted by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating (out of a 10 point scale) are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

    Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
    Most units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment, which may come in many forms (case study, research paper, etc.). You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

    Group Activities
    During this course, you will be required to complete work as part of a small group. Group work is an important component of your coursework, as it allows you to deepen relationships with classmates, and gain a more thorough understanding of the topics presented in this course. Further, group work mimics the business environment in which projects are often conducted in small teams across different departments. You will be randomly assigned to your groups and are expected to work with your teammates throughout the term for all group activities.

    Reflective Portfolio Activities
    Portfolio Activities are tools for self-reflection and evaluation within the context of the course. These activities are designed as a means to document and critically reflect upon your learning process. Activities you develop for this course will be kept in your Research and Practice Portfolio and will be important as you progress towards the final courses in your program, particularly the Advanced Practice and Capstone courses.  Ideally, you will draw from your coursework and experiences, as well as what you’ve learned in other courses, and your own current teaching practice to showcase your overall growth and examine ways in which you can continue to develop and sharpen your research interests and expand your cadre of instructional methods.

    Research and Practice Portfolio
    Throughout the M.Ed. Program, you will be building a portfolio of instructional strategies and materials, and acquiring knowledge and skills for advanced professional practice.  Students begin building their portfolio right from start.  It serves as a repository for research findings and sample units and lessons.  Students use it to archive ideas and resources related to instructional methods, classroom management, and assessment.  The portfolio supports your own self-reflection on changes that demonstrate growth in professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes that is part of the Capstone experience.    The component parts of the Research and Practice Portfolio include:

    • Reflective Portfolio Activities
    • Research
    • Teaching and Learning Resources

    Course Forum
    The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.

    Course Forum
    The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


    Course Policies:

    Grading Components and Weights
    Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

    Discussion Assignments  20%
    Written Assignments    30%
    Group Activities  25%
    Reflective Portfolio Activities  25%
    TOTAL 100%


    Grading Scale
    This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

    Letter Grade
    Grade Scale Grade Points
    A+ 98-100 4.00
    A 93-97 4.00
    A- 90-92 3.67
    B+ 88-89 3.33
    B 83-87 3.00
    B- 80-82 2.67
    C+ 78-79 2.33
    C 73-77 2.00
    C- 70-72 0.00
    D+ 68-69 0.00
    D 63-67 0.00
    D- 60-62 0.00
    F Under 60 0.00
    CR N/A N/A
    NC N/A N/A
    NF N/A N/A
    W N/A N/A


    Grade Appeal

    If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

    Participation
    Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

    • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
    • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
    • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
    • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

    Academic Honesty and Integrity
    When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

    Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several styles and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

    Code of Conduct
    University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.