UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

Master of Education in Advanced Teaching (M.Ed.)

EDUC 5281 Advanced Practices for Teaching Literature and Writing at the Secondary Level

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EDUC 5281: Advanced Practices for Teaching Literature and Writing at the Secondary Level


Credits: 3

Prerequisites:  EDUC 5280


Course Description:  

This course will explore adolescent literature and the variety of formats in which it exists.  Attention will be given to understanding how students comprehend content material and to the socio-cultural influences on reading, reading/writing relationships, and assessment of content reading.  Ways to teach students to critically read and create media will be discussed.  Research on writing will be reviewed and methods of teaching writing for and models for responding to and evaluating student writing will be explored.


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

  • This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

To access the LIRN resources you must log in to Moodle and access the Library and Information Resource Network (LIRN) located under the Resources link on the Home page. Click on the Alphabetical View tab at the top of the page and scroll down to the database where the resource is located (eBook Central, ERIC, Gale, etc). Copy and paste the title of the resource into the search bar. A link to the resource will appear. If you have any problems please contact library@uopeople.edu.


Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Identify with their experiences in the reading and writing process and how that experience affects their own teaching style.
  2. Explore issues related to teaching reading, writing, and literacy practices in secondary classrooms.
  3. Familiarize themselves with culturally diverse texts to incorporate global thinking into secondary classrooms.
  4. Plan units that incorporate reading and writing strategies in a secondary classroom.

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week.

Week 1: Unit 1 - Our Literacy Story

Week 2: Unit 2 - Choosing Appropriate Reading Sources 

Week 3: Unit 3 - Teaching Strategies: Literature 

Week 4: Unit 4 - Nonfiction: Reading Strategies 

Week 5: Unit 5 - Teaching Strategies: Creative Writing 

Week 6: Unit 6 - Teaching Strategies: Essays

Week 7: Unit 7 - Putting It into Practice: Creating Reading & Writing Activities

Week 8: Unit 8 - Putting it into Practice: Creating Reading & Writing Assessments


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.  The Learning Guides for all units open on the first day of class.  Please review all Learning Guides to access the readings, review assignments, etc. 

Unit 1: Our Literacy Story

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. UNICEF (January 2018). Literacy data. Retrieved from https://data.unicef.org/topic/education/literacy/#.

  • Consider the data from this site, which explores literacy statistics around the world.

2. Institute of Education Sciences (2017). Teaching secondary students to write effectively.  Retrieved from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/wwc_secondary_writing_110116.pdf.

  • Read pages 1-42 in this document to gain a better understanding of best practices in secondary classrooms, as well as today’s definitions of literacy. These studies will guide your understanding of an appropriate selection of texts and strategies in secondary educational contexts.

3. What Works Clearinghouse (2008). Improving adolescent literacy: Effective classroom and intervention practices. Retrieved from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/adlit_pg_082608.pdf.

  • Read pages 11-36 of this document to better understand literacy best practices. To effectively teach literature and writing at the secondary level, we must first know what research says about best practice, as well as the process learners have been taught for reading before they enter our classroom. 

Unit 2: Choosing Appropriate Reading Sources 

  • Peer assess Unit 1 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Urquhart, V., & Frazee, D. (2012). Teaching reading in the content areas: If not me, then who? Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

  • Read pages 1-9 which provide some important research and theories on the importance of student reading.
2. Schoenbach, R. Greenleaf, C. Murphy, L., Cziko, C. & Hurwitz, L. (2012). Reading for understanding: How reading apprenticeship improves disciplinary learning in secondary and college classrooms. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.
  • Read pages 135-166 which explain some of the background information on the importance of academic reading in addition to strategies for using and choosing texts.
3. Berger, R., Woodfin, L., Vilen, A., & Mehta, J. (2016). Learning that lasts: Challenging, engaging, and empowering students with deeper instruction. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

  • Read pages 68-83 and 353-355 where the authors focus on process and factors of choosing texts.
4. Woodfin, L., Berger, R., Plaut, S.N., & Dobbertin, C.B. (2014). Transformational literacy: Making the Common Core shift with work that matters. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.
  • Read pages 22-46 which discuss the importance of choosing texts that are ‘worthy’ of student use, including different examples.
Optional Video

1. Teaching Channel (n.d.). Assessing text complexity. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/assess-text-complexity-parcc (4:02)
  • This video explains the importance of text complexity and how it can be applied in the classroom.

Unit 3: Teaching Strategies: Literature 

  • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Begin and participate in the Group Activity (Due Unit 7)
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Urquhart, V., & Frazee, D. (2012). Teaching reading in the content areas: If not me, then who? Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

    • Read pages 66-92 which outlines and describes a wide variety of strategies for teaching literature.

2. Ontario Ministry of Education (n.d.). Think literacy: Cross-curricular approaches, grades 7-12. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/thinkliteracy/files/Reading.pdf

    • Read pages 8-79 explore this list of reading strategies for pre-reading, during reading and after reading of multiple text types, focusing on the literary text ideas.

Optional Videos

1. Teaching Channel (2018). Preparing for literature circles with a jigsaw. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/literature-circle-prep-sfusd  (3:20)

    • Watch this video which focuses on preparing learners for literature circles using a jigsaw activity. Consider how a jigsaw can increase learner engagement?

2. Teaching Channel (2018). Deepening text analysis through student talk. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/text-analysis-lesson-ousd (8:10)

    • Watch this video which focuses on analyzing and interpreting characters’ actions within a text.

3. Teaching Channel (2018).  Remember it with a bookmark. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/simple-reading-strategy. (3:01)

    • Watch this video which focuses on providing learners with reading tips on a bookmark. As you watch, also consider how else bookmarks could be used to support reading.

4. Teaching Channel (2018). Rising to the challenge with literature circles. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/literature-circles-in-action (9:04)

    • Watch this video which focuses on the benefits of analyzing texts using a literature circle model. Consider the differences between a literature circle and typical group work.

5. Teaching Channel (2018). Analyzing and adapting text. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyze-adapt-text (10:16)

    • Watch this video which focuses on analyzing a speech using varying strategies. As you watch, think about the different ways the teacher makes this text relevant to learners.

6. Teaching Channel (2018). Vocabulary paint chips. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/build-student-vocabulary (1:41)

    • Watch this video which focuses on a strategy for enhancing learner vocabulary.

7. Teaching Channel (2018). Post Its: Little notes for big discussions. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/enhance-student-note-taking (1:41)

    • Watch this video which focuses on helping learners take notes to guide their reading and classroom discussions.

8. Teaching Channel (2018).  Thinking notes: A strategy to encourage close reading. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student-annotated-reading-strategy (1:42)

    • Watch this video which focuses on helping learners track their thinking using “thinking notes.”

9. Teaching Channel (2018). Scaffolding for Socratic seminar. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/prepare-for-socratic-seminar-ousd (10:26)

    • Watch this video which focuses on using controversial texts to engage students in conversation.

10. Teaching Channel (2018).  Poetry visualization: Draw what you hear. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-poetry-with-visualization (5:04)

    • Watch this video which focuses on using varied modalities of teaching to analyze poetry.

Unit 4: Nonfiction: Reading Strategies 

  • Peer assess Unit 3 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Wray, D. (2005). Teaching and learning literacy: Reading and writing texts for a purpose. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

  • Read chapter 4 (pages 89-114) which focuses on strategies to use for getting students actively involved in nonfiction reading.
2. Ceranic, H. (2009). English teacher’s handbook. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.
  • Read pages 79-84 which provide some focus points for teaching nonfiction, including media.
3. Hamilton, B. (2015). Integrating technology in the classroom: Tools to meet the need of every student. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.
  • Read chapters 5 & 6 (pages 81-101) which discusses ways to utilize technology with students; many of these can be used for nonfiction reading.
4. Einstein, C. (2003). Activating comprehension: Non-fiction in the classroom. Retrieved from https://eps.schoolspecialty.com/EPS/media/Site-Resources/Downloads/articles/Nonfiction.pdf
  • This article provides some common yet effective strategies for improving reading comprehension of nonfiction texts.
Optional Video
1. Teaching Channel (n.d.). Comic book templates: An entry point into nonfiction. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/teaching-nonfiction-entry-points (8:21)
  • This video shows how comic books can be used to introduce students to the genre of nonfiction.
2. Teaching Channel (n.d.). Inquiry-based teaching: Discussing non-fiction. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/inquiry-based-teaching-discussing-non-fiction (6:11)
  • This video focuses on strategies for student discussion on nonfiction texts.

Unit 5: Teaching Strategies: Creative Writing 

  • Peer assess Unit 4 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Morrissey, F.A. (n.d.). Write on!- Creative writing as language practice. Retrieved from http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/write-creative-writing-language-practice
  • This document outlines and discusses some benefits of creative writing.

2. Henderson, J. (2008). Developing students’ creative skills for 21st century success. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/education-update/dec08/vol50/num12/Developing-Students'-Creative-Skills-for-21st-Century-Success.aspx

  • This article focuses on how creative thinking and creative writing can benefit modern students.

3. Graves, D. (n.d.). Creating a productive writing environment. Retrieved from https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/creating-productive-writing-environment/

  • This article provides some strategies for making your classroom creative writing-friendly; it is geared towards grades 1-8 but can easily be adapted to high school.

4. Drapeau, P. (2014). Sparking student creativity: Practical ways to promote innovative thinking and problem-solving. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic. 

  • Read pages 59-142 which give strategies and methods for incorporating creative thinking and writing into your curriculum.

5. Fisher, R. & Williams, M. (2005). Unlocking creativity: A teacher’s guide to creativity across the curriculum. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic. 

  • Read chapter 3 (pages 37-54) which provides some theories, strategies, and methods for using creative writing in the classroom.

6. Wyman, K. (2017). 6 strategies to motivate reluctant readers. Retrieved from https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/teaching-strategies-reluctant-writers/

  • This blog provides strategies for working with students who don’t want to write.

Optional Videos

1. Teaching Channel (2018). Creating digital stories. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/create-digital-story-ypp (10:04)

  • This video shows a method for integrating technology into creative writing.

2. Teaching Channel (2018). Writing Commentaries: The power of youth voice. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/writing-commentaries-ypp (9:04)

  • This video shows an example of a creative writing activity that promotes students to share their own stories.

3. Teaching Channel (2018). Creating found poems. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/creating-found-poems-lesson (5:26)

  • This video explains how to use found poems as a method for creative writing.

Unit 6: Teaching Strategies: Essays 

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Continue to participate in the Group Activity
  • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

Reading Assignment

1. Benjamin, A (2005). Writing in the content areas. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

  • Read pages 3-60 and 105-122 which focus on how, even if you are not an English teacher, you can teach writing in your classroom.

2. Wray, D. (2005). Teaching and learning literacy: Reading and writing texts or a purpose. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

  • Read pages 115-148 which focus on strategies for supporting students in their writing endeavors.

3. Cutler, D. (2014). To teach effective writing, model effective writing. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/teach-and-model-effective-writing-david-cutler

  • This resource provides a first-hand account of how one teacher approaches the writing process with his students.
Optional Videos

    1. Teaching Channel (2018). Strategies: Writing to learn. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/writing-to-learn (2:00)

    • This video demonstrates a strategy that can be used as a prewriting tactic or to get students accustomed to writing.

    2. Teaching Channel (2018). Spark your persuasive writing: 3 simple prompts. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/persuasive-story-starters-ypp (2:45)

    • This video offers some ideas on how to easily incorporate persuasive essay writing into your curriculum.

    3. Teaching Channel (2018). Five steps to revision: Using warm and cool feedback. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/revising-essays-nea (9:49)

    • This video provides some ideas for using revision with students to improve their writing.

    4. Teaching Channel (2018). Small group writing. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/high-school-writing-lesson-idea (4:21)

    • This video demonstrates how student collaboration can be incorporated into the writing process.

    5. Teaching Channel (2018). The writing recipe: Essay structure for ELLs. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/ell-essay-structure-lesson (7:21)

    • This video provides a strategy for helping non-native English speakers with their writing.

     Unit 7: Putting It into Practice: Creating Reading & Writing Activities

    • Peer assess Unit 6 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
    • Submit the final Group Activity 
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment

    Reading Assignment

    1. McKnight, K.S. (2014). Common Core literacy strategies for ELA, history/social studies, and the humanities, grades 6-12: Strategies to deepen content knowledge (grades 6-12). Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

    • Read chapters 7 & 8 (page 153-171) which focus on using technology in your activities and ensuring that you are using activities that prepare students for the future.

    2. Parlin, R.L. (2009). Classroom teacher’s survival guide: Practical strategies, management techniques, and reproducibles for new and experienced teachers. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

    • Read chapters 4 and 5 (pages 134-240) which provide multiple examples of activities to use in your lessons.

    3. Ullman, E. (2011). How to plan effective lessons. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/education-update/oct11/vol53/num10/How-To-Plan-Effective-Lessons.aspx

    • This article outlines the different aspects to consider when creating an effective lesson for your students.

    Optional Videos

    1. Teaching Channel (2018). Writing about math. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/writing-in-math-ells (1:35)

    • This video focuses on writing support and strategies specifically for mathematics.

    2. Teaching Channel (2018). Literary analysis through interactive stations. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/increase-engagement-and-understanding (4:43)

    • This video demonstrates an activity to help students with connecting text to discussion and writing.

    Unit 8: Putting it into Practice: Creating Reading & Writing Assessments

    • Peer assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
    • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
    • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
    • Complete the Reflective Portfolio Assignment
    • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

    Reading Assignment

    1. Anderson, L.W. (2003). Classroom assessment: Enhancing the quality of teacher decision making. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

    • Read chapters 1-4 (pages 1-94) which provide a solid introduction to assessment usage and application.                                                                                                                 

    2. Berry, R., & Kennedy, K.J. (2008). Assessment for learning. Retrieved from eBook Central (accessed through LIRN). If you are having trouble accessing eBook Central resources, please review the instructions: Finding a chapter in eBook Central Academic.

    • Read chapter 6 (pages 105-122) which focuses on creating assessments that speak to diverse students.                                                                                                                                                      
    3. University of Colorado (2006). Creating a rubric: An online tutorial for faculty. Retrieved from http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/faculty/center-for-faculty-development/Documents/Tutorials/Rubrics/index.htm
    • This site gives a thorough overview of how to create a rubric for use in alternative assessments. Be sure to look through all 6 modules.   
    Optional Videos                                                  

      1. Teaching Channel (2018). Tweet to share your learning. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/formative-assessment-twitter-ypp (2:14).

      • This video shows how to use Twitter as a formative assessment method; it can be adapted for other social media as well.                                                                                                                 

      2. Teaching Channel (2018). Using tech tools for formative assessment. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/student-assessment-with-tech (2:36).

      • This video demonstrates other types of technology and apps teachers can use for assessment.                                                                                                                                                 

      3. Teaching Channel (2018). Making feedback meaningful. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/personalize-feedback-for-students (10:06).

      • This video shows how a teacher uses feedback as a formative assessment strategy.              

      4. Teaching Channel (2018). Designing rubrics. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/designing-rubrics (2:11).

      • This video shows how to use a rubric as a formative assessment in the middle of an activity.

      Course Requirements:

      Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
      Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating (out of a 10 point scale) are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

      Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
      Most units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment, which may come in many forms (case study, research paper, etc.). You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates’ assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

      Group Activities
      During this course, you will be required to complete work as part of a small group. Group work is an important component of your coursework, as it allows you to deepen relationships with classmates, and gain a more thorough understanding of the topics presented in this course. Further, group work mimics the business environment in which projects are often conducted in small teams across different departments. You will be randomly assigned to your groups and are expected to work with your teammates throughout the term for all group activities.

      Reflective Portfolio Activities
      Portfolio Activities are tools for self-reflection and evaluation within the context of the course. These activities are designed as a means to document and critically reflect upon your learning process. Activities you develop for this course will be kept in your Research and Practice Portfolio and will be important as you progress towards the final courses in your program, particularly the Advanced Practice and Capstone courses.  Ideally, you will draw from your coursework and experiences, as well as what you’ve learned in other courses, and your own current teaching practice to showcase your overall growth and examine ways in which you can continue to develop and sharpen your research interests and expand your cadre of instructional methods.

      The Research and Practice Portfolio 
      Throughout the M.Ed. Program, you will be building a portfolio of instructional strategies and materials, and acquiring knowledge and skills for advanced professional practice.  Students begin building their portfolio right from start.  It serves as a repository for research findings and sample units and lessons.  Students use it to archive ideas and resources related to instructional methods, classroom management, and assessment.  The portfolio supports your own self-reflection on changes that demonstrate growth in professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes that is part of the Capstone experience.    The component parts of the Research and Practice Portfolio include:

      • Reflective Portfolio Activities
      • Research
      • Teaching and Learning Resources

      Course Forum
      The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


      Course Policies:

      Grading Components and Weights
      Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

      Discussion Assignments  20%
      Written Assignments    30%
      Group Activities  25%
      Reflective Portfolio Activities  25%
      TOTAL 100%


      Grading Scale
      This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

      Letter Grade
      Grade Scale Grade Points
      A+ 98-100 4.00
      A 93-97 4.00
      A- 90-92 3.67
      B+ 88-89 3.33
      B 83-87 3.00
      B- 80-82 2.67
      C+ 78-79 2.33
      C 73-77 2.00
      C- 70-72 0.00
      D+ 68-69 0.00
      D 63-67 0.00
      D- 60-62 0.00
      F Under 60 0.00
      CR N/A N/A
      NC N/A N/A
      NF N/A N/A
      W N/A N/A


      Grade Appeal

      If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

      Participation
      Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

      • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
      • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
      • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
      • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

      Academic Honesty and Integrity
      When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

      Any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several styles and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

      Code of Conduct
      University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.