UoPeople Online Syllabus Repository (OSR)

General Studies

POLS 1503 Globalization

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POLS 1503: Globalization


Syllabus



Prerequisites: None


Course Description:


This course examines changes in national economies over the past half-century. Special attention is given to the ways that globalization impacts citizenship, ethnic and religious issues, migration, public health, poverty, and wealth. The course’s cross-cultural context affords the opportunity to address issues of a global nature, which may profoundly influence the conditions under which people live and work.


Required Textbook and Materials:


All course readings can be accessed through web links, which will be provided within each Unit’s Learning Guide.

Some of the materials for this course can be found in this archive.


Software Requirements/Installation:


No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:


By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Explain the basic concepts and debates over economic globalization.
  2. Identify and explain the impacts of globalization across various aspects of life.
  3. Analyze the complexity of globalization and the many perspectives and positions of its supporters and critics cross-culturally, as well as develop your own perspective on the issue.
  4. Suggest strategies and methods for reducing harms and negative impacts of the globalization process.


Course Schedule and Topics:


This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week. The Final Exam will take place during Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople time).


Week 1: Unit 1  Introduction to Globalization

Week 2: Unit 2  Global Economic Development

Week 3: Unit 3  Globalization for Human Rights

Week 4: Unit 4  Technology and Globalization

Week 5: Unit 5  Development and Globalization

Week 6: Unit 6  Culture and Globalization

Week 7: Unit 7  Health and Globalization

Week 8: Unit 8  Poverty and Inequality

Week 9: Unit Course Review and Final Exam


Learning Guide:


The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.


This course does not have an assigned textbook. Instead, the readings will be found through web links within each Unit’s Learning Guide. Each week will include a Reading Assignment, and one or more of the following: a Learning Journal, a Discussion Assignment, and/or a Written Assignment. Some Units will also include an ungraded Self-Quiz. In other units, there will be a Graded Quiz. During Week/Unit 9, there will be a Final Exam.

When posting in the Discussion Forum in response to your Discussion Assignment, you should write posts that are at least 100 words in length. You should also respond to at least 3 of your classmates’ posts in each of the Discussion Forums, and remember to rate their answers to the question. Your posts and your responses should be thoughtful and demonstrative of your understanding of the topics being discussed in this course.


Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization

Tasks:

  • Introduce yourself to the class on the Course Forum
  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment
  • Respond to at least three Discussion Forum posts written by your fellow classmates
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


First, be sure to thoroughly read the Syllabus for this course available in the “General Information and Forums” section of the course home page.

Next, read the online synopsis, “What is Globalization?” Throughout the synopsis, click on each of the highlighted blue words to read into further depth about these key terms and topics:
http://www.globalization101.org/what-is-globalization/

Please watch the Tom Friedman interview, Globalization after September 11th, on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXI0VsX4NKI

Here is a summary of this week’s reading:

What is globalization? 
Globalization is a process of interaction and integration among people of all different backgrounds. It is driven by international trade, investment and aided by information technology.  Follow the links and read about these forces: 

NOTE:  if the Globalization101.org website is not working, you can access an archived version of the site here: 
https://web.archive.org/web/20160830223212/http:/www.globalization101.org/ 

Globalization is deeply controversial.

Three primary theories for how globalization was developed are provided. They are:

  1. World-System Theory
  2. World Polity Theory
  3. World Culture Theory

Debates over the meaning and merits of globalization:

  1. Kharas, H, & McArthur, J. (2016, October 5). Can globalization be rescued from itself? Brookings. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/research/can-globalization-be-rescued-from-itself/

  2. Collins, M. (2015, May 6). The pros and cons of globalization. Forbes. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikecollins/2015/05/06/the-pros-and-cons-of-globalization/#7abebc55ccce

  3. Cultural globalization. (n.d.). InternationalRelations.org. Retrieved from http://internationalrelations.org/cultural-globalization/

Videos

All videos have closed captioning or transcripts available. 

Unit 2: Global Economic Development

Tasks:

  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Complete the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum
  • Respond to three of your fellow classmates’ posts in the Discussion Forum
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Participate in the Poll

Reading Assignment


  • Read the overview describing the increase in economic globalization over the past several decades
  • Read the issue brief through the Levin Institute that describes the development, purpose, and criticisms of the International Financial Institutions (International Monetary Fund and World Bank)
Here is a summary of this week’s reading:

Merchandise trade after WWII marks the biggest growth period in economic globalization. The main forces driving globalization include:

  • Technological innovations (e.g. discovery of large oil fields in the Middle East, 1948)
  • Broader political changes (e.g. the establishment of the United Nations in 1945)
  • Economic policies (e.g. the establishment of Bretton Woods – IMF, World Bank, 1944 – 1971)

Development of the IMF and World Bank:

  • Conference at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, to address concerns about the stability of global economic markets

IMF Structure:

  • IMF is controlled by its 187 member-countries, each of whom appoints a representative to the IMF's Board of Governors
  • The IMF has three main activities: surveillance, financial assistance, and technical assistance

Why is the IMF Controversial?

  • Some critics say that the conditions of the loans are too controlling and don’t give the receiving country enough freedom to do things the way they feel is necessary
  • Some critics say that the IMF imposed the policies of the Washington Consensus without understanding the complexities of the nations they were working with
  • Some critics are displeased that the policies are imposed all at once
  • Some critics say that the IMF was not transparent or open to constructive feedback when developing their policies

World Bank Development and Structure:
Originally known as the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)

  • IBRD was founded at Bretton Woods
  • Structure is basically the same as that of the IMF; the majority of voting power is held by the U.S.
  • The mission of the IBRD claims that it "aims to reduce poverty in middle-income and creditworthy poorer countries by promoting sustainable development, through loans, guarantees, and non-lending-including analytical and advisory-services”

World Bank Initiatives:

  • The International Development Association (IDA) was organized by the World Bank in 1960 to provide additional financial assistance to the poorest developing countries
  • The International Finance Corporation (IFC) was established in 1956 and is now the largest public source of financial investment for private sector projects in developing countries
  • The Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) was created in 1988 to provide risk-balancing insurance services to foreign direct investment projects in developing countries
  • The World Bank established the International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) in 1966 to encourage both investors and governments to undertake and receive foreign direct investment by providing a neutral dispute resolution system

Criticisms of World Bank:
The World Bank has been criticized for lending to projects that caused environmental damage and social problems, as well as for causing too high of debt for developing countries.

Unit 3: Globalization for Human Rights

Tasks:

  • Peer-assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment
  • Respond to at least three Discussion Forum posts written by your fellow classmates
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Take the Graded Quiz

Reading Assignment


Read the brief on human rights development as it pertains to the topic of globalization

Here is a summary of the brief:

Globalization of Human Rights Movement
  • Charter of the United Nations was established, which later led to the International Bill of Rights
  • The rise of NGOs and Global Civil Society
  • United Nations securing freedom from torture
  • Criminalizing genocide in international law
  • International criminal court
  • Women’s rights
  • Children’s rights
  • Indigenous rights
  • Self-determination

Unit 4: Technology and Globalization

Tasks:

  • Read through the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Complete the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum
  • Respond to three of your fellow classmates’ posts in the Discussion Forum
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment  
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self Quiz

Reading Assignment


Read the educational brief on technology and globalization

Here is a summary of the brief:

Information Technology and its Impacts
  • Industrial structure and jobs
  • Workforce
  • Financial markets - increased global trade and monetary transactions (investors can withdraw on short notice from foreign markets, but this can result in short-term capital concerns)
IT Improving Sectors of Society
  • Health care – prevention, improved responses to outbreaks, patient to healthcare provider interaction
  • Education – greater access to education, resources are less expensive
  • Journalism and Media – makes multiple sources of media more accessible, and people can engage their opinions publicly, but it can also provide misinformation, which can become problematic
  • Government – greater access to government documents and information, can increase accountability of the work of governing bodies
Technology in Warfare
  • Communications and intelligence gathering
  • Weapons of mass destruction
  • Development of modern warfare
Social Networking Sites
  • Social networking
  • Corporate and market research and advertising
  • Global activism
  • Support groups
Peer Production – global, mass production of intellectual output

Open Source and Global Betterment – saves organizations millions of dollars 

Concerns of Technological Age
  • Digital Divide – only 30% of world’s population is online; this puts people in poverty, those in rural areas, and many people in developing countries at a great disadvantage
  • Privacy and security concerns – theft and fraud become more rampant

Unit 5: Development and Globalization

Tasks:

  • Peer-assess the Unit 4 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment
  • Respond to at least three Discussion Forum posts written by your fellow students. 
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


This week you will read the "Development and Globalization" issue brief.

Here is a summary of this week’s reading:

Major theories on which factors have historically impacted development:
  • Geography
  • Culture
  • Property rights
  • Lack of freedom
Problems of development today:
  • Structural constraints, including “poverty traps”
World Bank recommendations for nations struggling with development:
  • Countries should focus on: education and health; increased productivity of small farms; improved infrastructure; industrial policy to promote manufacturing; promotion of democracy and human rights; environmental protection
Development Assistance; Institutions of development include: 
  • Development banks (e.g. World bank)
  • United Nations Development Program (UNDP)
  • Government AID agencies
  • NGOs
Development Strategies:
  • Poverty reduction
  • Trade – not aid
  • Good governance
  • Sustainable development
  • Gender equality
  • New investment strategies, such as microfinancing/microcredit

Unit 6: Culture and Globalization

Tasks:

  • Peer Assess the Unit 5 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment
  • Respond to at least three Discussion Forum posts written by your fellow classmates
  • Make entries in the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Take the Graded Quiz

Reading Assignment


Read the "Culture and Globalization" issue brief.

Here is a brief summary of the reading:

Globalization vs. Local Cultures
Influence of US on global cultures
  • Dominance of the American market
Spread of American political and economic model
  • Cultural Impact # 1 - New Global Professions
  • Cultural Impact #2 – Pop Culture
  • Cultural Impact #3 – The Global Village (“cultural genocide?”)
Culture and trade disputes
  • Example: Canadian magazine dispute
  • Example: Protection of family farms
  • Example: Wildlife protection and cultural rights
Issues of imposing sanctions
  • Human rights or US arrogance?
Other Cultural Globalization Issues
  • Globalization vs. Asian values
  • Western values and Islam
  • Protecting languages
Organizations to assist with international cultural protection issues
  • International Network for Cultural Diversity
  • International Network on Cultural Policy

Unit 7: Health and Globalization

Tasks:

  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Complete the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum
  • Respond to three of your fellow classmates’ posts in the Discussion Forum
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


Read the issue brief on health and globalization.

Here is a summary of the brief:

Infectious diseases affected by globalization:
  • Increased global travel
  • Increased trade in goods
  • Food-borne illnesses
  • Urbanization
  • Climate change
  • Other environmental concerns
  • Microbial drug resistance
  • Breakdowns in public health systems
The global public health system: International public health officials believe we need improvements in:
  • Surveillance of new diseases and spread of current ones
  • Immunization
  • Research
  • Improved sanitation and living conditions
  • Price of drugs
Genetically Modified Organisms – very controversial practice
  • Highly beneficial: Increased yield and hardiness
  • Highly dangerous: Tinkering with nature
Global Diseases:
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Tuberculosis
  • Malaria
  • Cholera

Unit 8: Poverty and Inequality

Tasks:

  • Peer-assess Unit 7 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and the Reading Assignment
  • Complete the Discussion Assignment
  • Respond to at least three Discussion Forum posts written by your fellow students
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Read Unit 9 information about the Final Exam
  • Take the Review Exam
  • Complete the Course Evaluation

Reading Assignment


Read the following two brief articles regarding poverty and inequality in the world:

http://www.sharing.org/why-nations-need-to-share/global-poverty-inequality

http://www.sharing.org/information-centre/articles/aid-debt-and-development-overview

Then, read the interview with Dr. Vandana Shiva, of India, the author of Soil Not Oil: Justice in An Age of Climate Crisis:
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=11540

Here is a summary of the reading:

  • The gap between the rich and the poor is growing wider
  • Economic aid is linked to economic control
  • Popular media is linked to economic power
  • Concerns over sustainability, food production and availability, and equality

Unit 9: Course Review and Final Exam

Tasks:

  • Prepare for, take, and submit the Final Exam
  • The Final Exam will take place during Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople Time); exact dates, times, and other details will be provided accordingly by your instructor


Course Requirements


Written Assignments
In most units, you will be required to complete a Written Assignment. You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and in addition, to peer-assess three of your classmates’ assignments according to provided instructions. During this peer-assessment, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the assignment’s Specimen Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Failure to submit assignments and/or peer-assessments may result in failure of the course.

Discussion Assignments
All units require that you develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor, and is a minimum of 100 words in length.

In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three of your peers’ postings in the Discussion Forum. These response posts should each be at least 50 words in length.

Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum as required may result in failure of the course.

Learning Journals
Most units contain a Learning Journal. The Learning Journal is an important component of your learning in this course and is also a tool for self-reflection on the learning process.  The Learning Journal should be completed on time and they will be assessed by your instructor as part of your final grade. Only you and your instructor have access to the Learning Journal.

Quizzes
This course will contain two types of quizzes – the Self-Quiz and the Graded Quiz. These quizzes may contain multiple choice, true/false, or short answer questions.

The results of the Self-Quiz will not count towards your final grade. However, it is highly recommended that you complete the Self-Quiz each week to ensure that you have adequately understood the course materials. Along with the Reading Assignments, the results of the Self-Quiz should be used as part of an iterative learning process, to thoroughly cover and test your understanding of course material. You should use the results of your Self-Quiz each week as a guide to go back and review relevant sections of the Reading Assignments again.

The results of the Graded Quiz will count towards your final grade. Specific instructions on the format and content of the Graded Quiz will be provided by your instructor.

Final Exam
The Final Exam will take place during the Thursday and Sunday of Week/Unit 9, following the completion of eight units of work. The format of the Final Exam is similar to that of the quizzes and may contain a combination of different question types. You will have one attempt to take the exam, and it will be graded electronically. Specific instructions on how to prepare for and take the Final Exam will be provided during Week 8 (located inside the Unit 9 Learning Guide). Final Exams must be taken without the use of course learning materials (both those inside and outside the course). If particular materials are allowed for use during the exam, these will be noted in the exam’s instructions.

Course Forum
The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


Policies


Grading
This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

Letter Grade Grade Scale Grade Points
A+ 98-100 4.00
A 93-97 4.00
A- 90-92 3.67
B+ 88-89 3.33
B 83-87 3.00
B- 80-82 2.67
C+ 78-79 2.33
C 73-77 2.00
C- 70-72 1.67
D+ 68-69 1.33
D 63-67 1.00
D- 60-62 0.67
F Under 60 0.00


Grading Components and Weights
Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

Learning Journals 15%
Graded Quizzes 30%
Discussion Assignments 10%
Written Assignments 15%
Final Exam 30%


Grade Appeal
If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

Participation
Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

  • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
  • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
  • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
  • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

Academic Honesty and Integrity
If and when you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as “plagiarism” – which is effectively passing off an individual’s words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

Unless otherwise stated, any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is required for publication in most professional and academic journals. Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

Code of Conduct
University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted.

Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.