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General Studies

PSYC 1205 Emotional Intelligence

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PSYC 1205: Emotional Intelligence


Syllabus


Prerequisites: None.


Course Description: This course examines the concepts and practical applications of emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is the ability to manage one's own internal emotional environment and one's ability to participate in relationships with others.

Through a highly interactive format, the course will focus on how to assess basic skills in emotional intelligence, how to develop strategies to improve and enhance basic skill levels, and how to experiment with techniques that facilitate dealing with others of varying emotional backgrounds and competency levels.


Required Textbook and Materials: UoPeople courses use open educational resources (OER) and other materials specifically donated to the University with free permissions for educational use. Therefore, students are not required to purchase any textbooks or sign up for any websites that have a cost associated with them. The main required textbooks for this course are listed below, and can be readily accessed using the provided links. There may be additional required/recommended readings, supplemental materials, or other resources and websites necessary for lessons; these will be provided for you in the course's General Information and Forums area, and throughout the term via the weekly course Unit areas and the Learning Guides.

This course does not contain a main textbook; resources to all required reading will be provided in the course Learning Guide for each week.

Some of the materials for this course can be found in this archive.

Software Requirements/Installation: No special requirements.


Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Research and apply chosen concepts of Emotional Intelligence that increase personal effectiveness in business, academic and private environments (Includes chosen basic neuroscience, behavioral, organizational and psychological research-related topics)
  2. Differentiate and link EI five core competencies: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and interpersonal skills
  3. Apply basic theory of change management as it applies to EI on personal levels
  4. Support self and others in initiating the assessment and basic action planning pertaining to chosen EI needs
  5. Collaborate with others in experimenting with supportive leadership techniques leading to self-development (Includes a thorough investigation and practice of feedback for development-provision as well as reception skills).

Course Schedule and Topics: This course will cover the following topics in eight learning sessions, with one Unit per week. The Final Exam will take place during Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople time).

Week 1: Unit 1Setting the Stage for Me and My Performance

Week 2: Unit 2 - Reading Social Clues in Diverse Business Environments

Week 3: Unit 3 - Communicating Like a Leader, part 1

Week 4: Unit 4Feedback-Feed Now and Feed Forward (Communicating Like a Leader, part 2)

Week 5: Unit 5Communicating Like a Leader, part 3 (Tools)

Week 6: Unit 6 - Self-Talk

Week 7: Unit 7 - Managing Change, part 1

Week 8: Unit 8 - Managing Change, part 2

Week 9: Unit 9 - Course Review and Final Exam


Learning Guide: The following is an outline of how this course will be conducted, with suggested best practices for students.

Unit 1: Setting the Stage for Me and My Performance

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


  1. First things first—read page 16 to page 23 only: http://www.eiconsortium.org/pdf/EI_Issues_And_Common_Misunderstandings.pdf
  2. To further familiarize yourself with EI and find out the proper definitions, background information, dispel some myths surrounding EI and learn about additional EI assessment factors, please read: http://www.mosaicprojects.com.au/WhitePapers/WP1008_Emotional%20_Intellegence.pdf It is important to read the FULL DESCRIPTION of the above text, as it will provide you with the necessary basics.
  3. http://poole.ncsu.edu/documents/MBTI.ppt 
    Read this PPT on MBTI very carefully and ask yourself, while reading, which letters describe your preferences the best. Do it step-by-step, with the three preferences and one orientation, while reading all the slides.

Use the provided slides to get information as well as guide you through the questions. Your goal is to indicate what four letters represent your preferences the best. Your choices will be: Introverting–Extroverting, Sensing–Intuiting, Feeling–Thinking and Judging–Perceiving.

You are not asked at this point to take the actual test, just self-assess. You will have to disclose your four letters and be able to explain the process and the content of this exercise. An example could be: ISFJ, with a specific explanation of what each letter means for you in private, academic, social, and work-related environments.

Note: There are 16 MBTI types and all of them are valuable and important.

Information About Next Week’s MBTI-Related Exercise: Please, note that next week we will continue this exercise and you will be provided with a link where to take the relevant sorting test. This will be different from the non-obligatory test you might have taken at the beginning of this course. Please, know that when reading this Unit, you are asked to concentrate on the functional meaning of the information provided, understand the philosophy as well as your profile—as YOU perceive it. This is important, as next week your written task will be directly linked with what you learned this week and your ability to take each part of the MBTI preference-orientation and translate it (so to speak) into a very simple language that would appeal to a totally different individual. This means that you need to understand the MBTI tool—and not only know your preferences. So, if your profile, that you are finding out this week, is ISTJ (for instance), you will need next week to also familiarize yourself with the total opposite profile: ENFP. This means knowing what it means when one has a particular preference—not only yours. Knowing means being able to explain it to others, as well as use it as a tool to enhance your management of emotions, when it comes to using techniques and applying strategies. That is another reason why this week you need to spend quality time understanding your preferences and what they really mean. TBC next week.

Want to learn more?

Emotional intelligence is a multifaceted topic. Understanding where your strengths and limitations lie is even more important than knowing your overall score.

You might want to peruse a variety of EI-related tests and maybe even take one or two: http://www.queendom.com.

Unit 2: Reading Social Clues in Diverse Business Environments

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum) (Optional)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment

Reading Assignment


All readings are listed within the assignments for this week.

Unit 3: Communicating Like a Leader, part 1

  • Peer assess Unit 2 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Take the Graded Quiz

Reading Assignment


Emotional Intelligence and Effective Leadership, Bano Fakhra Batool, Superior University: http://jbsq.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/March_2013_8.pdf

Choose one effective strategy that you will follow. You will be asked to describe it in this week’s Discussion Assignment.

Graham, S. & Weiner, B. (1996). Theories and Principles of Motivation. Retrieved from: https://msu.edu/~dwong/CEP991/CEP991Resources/Graham-TheorPrinMotiv.pdf

You are expected to know the five theories of motivation. Throughout this week, you will be learning to put them to work by receiving and providing feedback.

Peruse the Training Manual on Non-Violent Communication

The purpose for your perusal is to be able to envision choosing one exercise to be done with a team of people. Imagine that you are a leader and need to motivate and train your team… How would you go about teaching others to be more enthusiastic and learn some new concepts? Could you do it without being enthusiastic? What strategies do you presently employ to work on your own motivation? You may want to reflect on these questions and, possibly, comment on this exercise in your Learning Journal.

Unit 4: Feedback-Feed Now and Feed Forward (Communicating Like a Leader, part 2)

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


  • Read the first 5-pages of the following article to learning more about feedback:  Mory, E. H. (2004). Feedback research revisited. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research on educational communications and technology (pp. 745-783). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Unit 5: Communicating Like a Leader, part 3 (Tools)

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


  1. Read about the SCARF Model: http://web.archive.org/web/20100705024057/http://www.your-brain-at-work.com/files/NLJ_SCARFUS.pdf 
  2. Research and read on NVC. You may revisit the NVC manual provided in Unit 3 for your exercise with a peer partner.

Please note that both tools can be and are used for developing EI. You are required to fully understand the theoretical side, as well as knowing the practical applications. These tools can help you develop your own EI and help others develop their own.

Unit 6: Self-Talk

  • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Take the Self-Quiz
  • Take the Graded Quiz

Reading Assignment


  1. Read: some good questions and suggestions on self-talk: http://psychcentral.com/lib/challenging-negative-self-talk/
  2. Expand your knowledge on control and influence: http://www.changecatalysts.com/when-change-is-out-of-your-control-what-you-can-do/
  3. Do some research on spheres of self-talk. Find your own reading resource and share with others in your class.
  4. Find out more about the spheres of influence: http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/coaching_teachers/2014/01/spheres_of_control.html

You may consider answering the following supplementary questions, if you find it useful: What kind of a leader am I? What are my leadership objectives? How do I take advantage of my strong points and minimize my weaker points in communicating with others? What is it that I need to change in myself to become more effective or happy (or both)? Are any of the above questions part of my self-talk?

Why and why not?

Unit 7: Managing Change, part 1

  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Participate in the Discussion Assignment (post, comment, and rate in the Discussion Forum)
  • Complete and submit the Wiki Assignment
  • Complete and submit the Written Assignment
  • Take the Self-Quiz

Reading Assignment


1. Read:

  • Harfield, E., Cacioppo, J., Rapson, R. (1993). Emotional Contagion. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2(1), 96-99.
  •  Barsade, S. (2002). The Ripple Effect: Emotional Contagion and Its Influence on Group Behavior. Administrative Science Quarterly, 47(4), 644-675.

Yes! We do need others to help us develop. You will experience it this week. Please know that on top of studying the text, you will have to choose one emotion from this list:

http://www.psychpage.com/learning/library/assess/feelings.html

 This—you choosing one emotion and learning more about it—might help you in planning and decision making. Moreover, reflection linked with improving the chosen emotion will help you in considering all four SWOT (refer to point 2) analysis elements that you will explore when doing your personal SWOT.

2. Read: https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_05_1.htm

This link with help you learn about SWOT analysis vis a vis personal development plan. The example used in the above reading is based on career choices. You can choose something similar when creating your personal SWOT but you do not need to limit yourself to career only. You can choose whatever you like to work on and improve at this time. 

3. Read http://www.brocku.ca/webfm_send/1394

This reading is about SMART goals. You will need to understand the SMART concept thoroughly because you will be posting your (one) SMART goal in the discussion forum. The SMART methodology will help you provide constructive feedback to others.

Unit 8: Managing Change, part 2

  • Peer assess Unit 5 Written Assignment
  • Read the Learning Guide and Reading Assignments
  • Complete and submit the Wiki Assignment
  • Make entries to the Learning Journal
  • Read the Unit 9 Learning Guide carefully for instructions on the Final Exam
  • Take the Review Quiz
  • Complete and submit the anonymous Course Evaluation

Reading Assignment


Examples of EI tools:

Please read the following examples and related articles.

(Note: These are just some examples. You can choose something very different.)

Example #1:

http://www.fupress.net/index.php/formare/article/download/12559/11896
My EI Tool: I found the above article and chose to follow the notion of serendipitous learning from now on.

My Tasks:

  1. Allocate 20 minutes weekly to serendipitous learning.
  2. I will start on .......(insert the date) at............(insert the time).
  3. I will write down my findings (bullet form) in...................(notebook, Electronic journal, sent e-mails to self—choose as appropriate).
  4. I will go over my findings once per .........(week? once per 10 days? Choose as appropriate and doable per your schedule).

EI impact sought:  I will support my own development and find many topics to use in future conversations with others—thus will help others grow their EI awareness.

Example #2:

My Own Feedback Framework

Tool: Power Point. The feedback framework is on slide 15.

Task: Peruse all, decide to use the framework and prepare a SMART plan to do it.

How will it contribute to my community (Impact sought)?

By engaging others in conversations about feedback I will help others to grow awareness and provide more feedback practice.

Example #3: IE Checklist

Tool: Text and checklists—below

Task: Develop and use the checklist and prepare a SMART plan to use it.

The purpose of this checklist is to support you in the process of developing Emotional Intelligence.  The process started with your birth—no doubt, but your conscious efforts might date quite a bit later. The most recent one might be associated with taking this EI course—we hope! This tool can help you assess your EI development needs as well as implement desired changes—as per your decisions and needs.

We continue to create a lot of positive energy moving forward in this course. You are encouraged to continue, fuse the theory with the appropriate practice…Some of you might say: easier said than done, so, to help you do just that, you are invited to use the short EI checklist. The checklist provides questions and suggestions leading to raised awareness, practicing inclusivity and when appropriate, providing accommodation—to self and others. It is based on Non Violent Communication in a way that it is linked with noticing and viewing needs—your own as well as the needs of others.  It is also based on the work of Daniel Goleman around focused leadership. It is a decision making tool to be used any time you wish—and especially when making decisions.

This checklist is divided into the following four categories applicable to all individuals working on developing EI:

  1. Building Knowledge and Awareness;
  2. Incorporating Individuality-Collectiveness (at the thinking level first);
  3. Practicing Inclusivity; and
  4. Providing (or Requesting) Accommodation (what in NLP is presented as NEEDS)

The checklist provides direct links to the leadership competencies related to developing EI. All of these were and will be covered at a basic level in this course. An example of a leadership-based EI skills is providing and receiving constructive feedback.

These steps can be used in conjunction with any prior steps, processes you established, or strategies you are practicing. This also applies to self-evaluation as well as evaluating behaviors of others. Dealing with clients while showing an elevated diversity-based awareness, practicing Individuality-Collectiveness inclusivity and providing accommodation have direct links to core competencies and evaluating self and others.

In this checklist, clients are defined as external as well as internal—your peers and family members and friends, included. Having global competencies leads to increased EI, respect, well-being and overall positive climate. In other words, this checklist facilitates dialogue between any individuals to enable integration whereby everyone can feel at ease to contribute and strive for individual happiness.

The checklist can be presented as a set of questions, divided into four sections, that we need to ask ourselves every time we are about to make a decision:

  1. Have I built enough Knowledge and Awareness—do I see the issue I am deliberating about as a pluralistic occurrence, not happening in a silo? If I see it as my issue only, I am not ready yet..

A reminder: Nothing happens in a silo. Have I risen above my first assumption? How and when? Have I risen above my ego? Reminder: to take any action or to communicate on the topic, I need to raise above the first wave of emotions on the subject or issue. Have I done this? Or not just yet? I need to take the time to cool off, reach out to others, if not.

  1. Incorporating Individuality-Collectiveness. Have I deliberated about my desired gains-views as well as possible gains of others—affected by what I am about to do? If I only see myself and feel only my own needs, I have to go back to step 1 as it seems that I am not ready yet.
  2. Practicing Inclusivity. Have I truly taken into considerations the interests of others? The consequences of my decision on others? Maybe not enough? Or, too much? Have I talked to them about it? Am I aware of the needs of others? Am I aware of my own needs? Have I made others aware of my needs? Have I clarified them with the source—myself?
  3. Providing (or Requesting) Accommodation. Have I established my needs and the needs of others? Have I asked to be accommodated? Have I explained why and how? Have I accepted to help accommodate someone else’s valid needs?

A Kinesthetic Version:

  1. Look up (rising above own prejudices and limitations)—Have I built Knowledge and Awareness—do I see the issue I am deliberating about as a pluralistic occurrence, not in a silo? Have I risen above my first assumption? How and when?  If you are experiencing problems recalling how and when, you probably need to go back to the very beginning.
  2. Look down (back to earth—I am part of many—my needs as well as the needs of others have to be taken into account)—Incorporating Individuality-Collectiveness. Have I deliberated about my gains-views as well as others affected by what I am about to do?
  3. Look Left—Practicing Inclusivity. Have I taken into considerations the interests of others? Maybe not enough? Or, too much? Am I fully aware of and have I discussed the needs of others? Have I clarified them with the source?
  4. Look Right—Providing (or Requesting) Accommodation. Have I established my needs and the needs of others? Have I asked to be accommodated? Have I accepted to help accommodate someone else’s valid needs?

Example:

My desired task is:………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 

  1. Look up (rising above own prejudices and limitations)—Have I built Knowledge and Awareness—do I see the issue I am deliberating about as a pluralistic occurrence, not in a silo? Have I raised above my first assumption? How and when? If you are experiencing problems recalling how and when, you probably need to go back to the very beginning.
  2. Look down (back to earth—I am part of many—my needs as well as the needs of others have to be taken into account)—Incorporating Individuality-Collectiveness. Have I deliberated about my gains-views as well as others affected by what I am about to do?
  3. Look Left—Practicing Inclusivity. Have I taken into considerations the interests of others? Maybe not enough? Or, too much? Am I fully aware of and have I discussed the needs of others? Have I clarified them with the source?
  4. Look Right—Providing (or Requesting) Accommodation. Have I established my needs and the needs of others? Have I asked to be accommodated? Have I accepted to help accommodate someone else’s valid needs?

Specific Example:

My task is to ask other students for better feedback.

  1. I need solid feedback. If I push others to provide it to me, they will also benefit (in the longer run). Their benefits are: ……….and ………..as well as………….
  2. Others might have needs that I am not aware of. They are not me. I need to ask them about their needs and do so in a way that will facilitate disclosure. They might not know right off the bat. I might have to probe. I have to be ready not to stop but keep probing. I could ask what would help them to provide solid feedback to me (and in general). I could ask what they need from me. I could ask them to recall good feedback that they received and what would need to happen so that they could give similar quality feedback to me.
  3. I need to be considerate, and acknowledge that there are others who might not be able to give me what I want and need. I will say: I need solid feedback in order to learn. Can you help me, please? I need details from you so that I can incorporate them into my own growth. Can I count on you and your support? How can I convince you that when you provide me detailed feedback you also grow by sharpening your evaluation skills and your kindness?
  4. I need specific feedback on ……………………………and ………………………..as well as……………………………………….. I am presently working on………………………….., so anything related to growing……………………………..is helpful. Anything.

What can I provide to you in order to receive your feedback? If you cannot give it to me right now, could you perhaps at a later time? How can I help you provide me feedback? Thank you.

Knowledge and Awareness

Outcome: Raising the knowledge level pertaining to diversity-based performance management. As we all perform, have developed certain qualities and are of certain background and circumstances, the need to fuse these three functions (performing, having and being) is reflective of our needs as diverse people at work. We evolve together with our collective needs. It is time to ensure that our knowledge also evolves at the same rate as our needs and the needs of others. How can we do more?

Questions:

  1. How aware am I of who I am?
  2. How aware am I about my own bias?
  3. Do I take the time to step out of my auto-pilot? What are the decisions I am making that consider my needs as well as the needs of others?

 These can happen through:

  • Conversations
  • Feedback
  • Meetings
  • Planning and assessing needs
  • Social gatherings
  • Communications
  • Providing a variety of services to others and
  • Coaching for performance
  1. What was my last action (pertaining to the above) in which I demonstrated enhanced knowledge and raised awareness of my needs as well as the needs of others?
  2. Have I taken into account culture, religion, disability, traditions—both mine as well as others’?
  3. What are my trusted resources to raise any questions I might have on this topic?

Practice

Outcome: Action-based approach to practicing inclusivity (showing consideration and being flexible).

Questions:

  1. How am I practicing effective communication?
  2. How am I structuring my efforts (thinking and acting)?
  3. Do I have an example of using NVC recently?
  • ASK, LISTEN and ACT
  • Ask for Feedback and receive open and constructive strategies

Accommodation

Outcome:  Others’ needs are accommodated. This means my needs as well.

  1. Am I aware? How do I show it?
  2. What are my needs requiring accommodation?
  3. Have I communicated?
  4. What are my strategies when it comes to delivering a respectful rejection for accommodation? How do I  ensure that it does not impact other people in a negative manner?

By using the chosen checklist each time I am dealing with some difficult issues, I will gain the time to think and act appropriately. Everyone will benefit.

Example #4: My Mentoring

Tool: I wrote about mentoring, and considered it as a thing to do.

Task: I will mentor, or I will look for a mentor by……(insert date)

Please refer to the PowerPoint (in PDF format) provided here. Mentoring helps to develop EI for all involved. This tool section is devoted to helping self and others decide about getting involved in mentoring.

Mentoring…is it about age?

....Mentoring and the reverse mentoring topic.

I think the reason for associating age difference between any mentor and his or her partner (mentee, protégé) is well rooted in history. The story of Mentor comes from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus, king of Ithaca, who was involved in the Trojan War, entrusted his household (and his son) to Mentor. Mentor mentored(!) Odysseus' son, Telemachus. Obviously, there was a big age difference between the two. A bit later, Athena, Goddess of War and patroness of the arts and industry, became Telemachus' mentor. So, that is the historical part..

Nowadays, in most of the available mentorship definitions that I am familiar with, it is noted that the difference between the two partnering individuals is in age, but more so in knowledge—kind of the two factors combined...kind of.... This means that someone younger can mentor an older individual. Or, (my opinion), this might follow more of the coaching pattern...

Mentoring is a bit wider and circles around many skillsets rather than one skill only (like, for instance, a younger person supporting an older person in learning how to use an iPhone, or similar—a straightforward coaching situation, I think. Thus, I would think that it is possible for a younger person to mentor someone older—if they are doing knowledge transfer (not a transfer of one skill). Most likely, though, when engaged in knowledge transfer of one skill, what they are involved in is coaching. And, there is nothing reverse about it—I agree.

The word Mentor evolved to mean trusted advisor, friend, teacher and wise person—all the listed qualities linked together, with special emphasis on the wisdom of the mentor. History offers many examples of helpful mentoring relationships: Socrates and Plato, Hayden and Beethoven, Freud and Jung, the list goes on and on... These examples prove again that most often a more experienced (and advanced in age) person was mentoring someone less experienced and younger. Of course, this notion is being challenged now.

Mentoring now is not always viewed as a situation where one person invests time, energy and personal know-how in assisting the growth and ability of another person who is 100% receiving the goods only... Most often we see mentoring as a reciprocal learning. I often use the notion of Mentors learning (honing) their Emotional Intelligence while helping others succeed. For the reciprocity reasons I insist that the title “Mentoring Partner” should be used, rather than mentee or protégé (very old language—Telemachus- and Mentor-times—language I do not like because of the power imbalance that is implied there). I prefer Mentor and Mentoring Partner.

Mentoring is a fundamental form of human development. There are many different possibilities as to how we do it and how we call it—of course. Group mentoring is something that I have done and enjoyed—to give another example. Group mentoring could be one mentor and many mentoring partners or vice versa—both great options.  

Also, as a certified coach, I would need to add one more thing: let's not underestimate the powers of coaching—be it certified, managerial, or on the job. When I was in Kenya teaching a course on Mentoring to African officers, I learned a great comparison: coaching is like parenting (brush your teeth this way, ride a bike by pushing on the pedals), while mentoring is more like being a grandparent (hmmm, you want to ride a bike? Are you sure that where you want to go, a bike will be the best means of transportation? Do you want to talk about it?).

My two pennies on the subject...

I also want to add the importance of mentoring moments. One of my greatest mentoring lessons came from my daughter when she was 4 years old. Maybe a different story for another time...Yes, storytelling is an excellent way to learn from others as well as from ourselves. What’s your story?

Example # 5: Learning a new Language

Tool: I found an article on learning a new language.

Task: Decide to learn a new language at a basic level. Share with others my decision. Do it.

 1. Read the following article.

https://agenda.weforum.org/2015/04/how-the-language-you-speak-changes-your-view-of-the-world/

2. Decide.

3. Shared benefits include self and all involved in this project.

My tool: I decided to learn…………………………..because…………………….This will help me in developing my EI by……………………………I will learn another language because…... I will learn…. (name of the language). I will start learning on…..(insert a date) by……….I will increase my EI as a result because………….and………………………

You have perused the five different EI tools prepared just for you. Now it is time to design and develop your own EI tool. Your tool can be similar or very different from the ones listed above—your tool, your decision. 

Follow the pattern:

My Tool: …………………………………………………………………………………………

Task or tasks……………………………………………………………………………………

How will it contribute to my community (EI Impact sought)?.................................................

Unit 9: Course Review and Final Exam

  • Read the Learning Guide and take the Review Quiz, if you haven't already done so
  • Prepare for, take, and submit the Final Exam
  • The Final Exam will take place during the Thursday and Sunday of Week/Unit 9 (UoPeople time); exact dates, times, and other details will be provided accordingly by your instructor

Course Requirements:

Written Assignments & Assessment Forms
Some units in this course require that you complete a Written Assignment. You are required to submit your assignments by the indicated deadlines and, in addition, to peer assess three (3) of your classmates' assignments according to the instructions found in the Assessment Form, which is provided to you during the following week. During this peer assessment period, you are expected to provide details in the feedback section of the Assessment Form, indicating why you awarded the grade that you did to your peer. Please note that each assignment grade is comprised of a combination of your submission (90%) and your peer assessments (10%). Failure to submit Written Assignments and/or Assessment Forms may result in failure of the course.

Discussion Assignments & Response Posts/Ratings
Some units in this course require that you complete a Discussion Assignment. You are required to develop and post a substantive response to the Discussion Assignment in the Discussion Forum. A substantive response is one that fully answers the question that has been posed by the instructor. In addition, you must extend the discussion by responding to at least three (3) of your peers' postings in the Discussion Forum and by rating their posts. Instructions for proper posting and rating are provided inside the Discussion Forum for each week. Discussion Forums are only active for each current and relevant learning week, so it is not possible to contribute to the forum once the learning week has come to an end. Failure to participate in the Discussion Assignment by posting in the Discussion Forum and responding to peers as required may result in failure of the course.

Learning Journals
Your instructor may choose to assign specific topics and/or relevant questions as a weekly Learning Journal entry for you to complete, but you are still encouraged to also use it to document your activities, record questions/problems you may have encountered, reflect on the learning process, and draft answers for other course assignments. The Learning Journal must be updated on a weekly basis, because its entries will be assessed by your instructor directly as a part of your final grade. The Learning Journal will only be seen by your instructor.

Wiki Assignment
A wiki is a collaborative tool supported by a variety of platforms including Moodle. When collaborating in a wiki, a group of participants can work on the same document and share thoughts, ideas as well as edits. Detailed information about wikis can be found at http://c2.com/cgi/wiki.

Quizzes
This course will contain three types of quizzes - the Self-Quiz, the Graded Quiz, and the Review Quiz. These quizzes may contain multiple choice, true/false, or short answer questions. The results of the Self-Quiz will not count towards your final grade. However, it is highly recommended that you complete the Self-Quiz to ensure that you have adequately understood the course materials. Along with the Reading Assignments, the results of the Self-Quiz should be used as part of an iterative learning process, to thoroughly cover and test your understanding of course material. You should use the results of your Self-Quiz as a guide to go back and review relevant sections of the Reading Assignments. Likewise, the Review Quiz will not count towards your final grade, but should also be used to assist you in a comprehensive review and full understanding of all course material, in preparation for your Final Exam. Lastly, the results of the Graded Quiz will count towards your final grade. Specific instructions on the format and content of the Graded Quiz will be provided by your instructor.

Final Exam
The Final Exam will take place during the Thursday and Sunday of Week/Unit 9, following the completion of eight units of work. The format of the Final Exam is similar to that of the quizzes, and may contain a combination of different question types. You will have one attempt to take the exam, and it will be graded electronically. Specific instructions on how to prepare for and take the Final Exam will be provided during Week 8 (located inside the Unit 9 Learning Guide). Final Exams must be taken without the use of course learning materials (both those inside and outside the course). If particular materials are allowed for use during the exam, these will be noted in the exam’s instructions.

Course Forum
The Course Forum is the place to raise issues and questions relating to the course. It is regularly monitored by the instructors, and is a good place to meet fellow students taking the same course. While it is not required to participate in the Course Forum, it is highly recommended.


Course Policies:

Grading Components and Weights
Each graded component of the course will contribute some percentage to the final grading scale, as indicated here:

Discussion Assignments  15%
Written Assignments 10%
Learning Journals 15%
Two Graded Quizzes 30%
Final Exam 30%
TOTAL 100%

Grading Scale
This course will follow the standard 100-point grading scale defined by the University of the People, as indicated here:

Letter Grade
Grade Scale Grade Points
A+ 98-100 4.00
A 93-97 4.00
A- 90-92 3.67
B+ 88-89 3.33
B 83-87 3.00
B- 80-82 2.67
C+ 78-79 2.33
C 73-77 2.00
C- 70-72 1.67
D+ 68-69 1.33
D 63-67 1.00
D- 60-62 0.67
F Under 60 0.00

Grade Appeal
If you believe that the final grade you received for a course is erroneous, unjust, or unfair, please contact your course instructor. This must be done within seven days of the posted final grade. For more information on this topic, please review the Grade Appeal Procedure in the University Catalog.

Participation
Non-participation is characterized by lack of any assignment submissions, inadequate contributions to the Discussion Forums, and/or lack of peer feedback to Discussion/Written Assignments. Also, please note the following important points about course participation:

  • Assignments must be submitted on or before the specified deadline. A course timeline is provided in the course schedule, and the instructor will specify deadlines for each assignment.
  • Any student showing non-participation for two weeks (consecutive or non-consecutive) is likely to automatically fail the course.
  • Occasionally there may be a legitimate reason for submitting an assignment late. Most of the time, late assignments will not be accepted and there will be no make-up assignments.
  • All students are obligated to inform their instructor in advance of any known absences which may result in their non-participation.

Academic Honesty and Integrity
When you submit any work that requires research and writing, it is essential to cite and reference all source material. Failure to properly acknowledge your sources is known as "plagiarism” - which is effectively passing off an individual's words or ideas as your own. University of the People adheres to a strict policy of academic honesty and integrity. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in sanctions by the University, including dismissal from the University or course failure. For more information on this topic, please review the Academic Integrity Policy in the University Catalog.

Unless otherwise stated, any materials cited in this course should be referenced using the style guidelines established by the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA format is widely used in colleges and universities across the world and is one of several style and citation formats required for publication in professional and academic journals. Purdue University's Online Writing LAB (OWL) is a free website that provides excellent information and resources for understanding and using the APA format and style. The OWL website can be accessed here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

Code of Conduct
University of the People expects that students conduct themselves in a respectful, collaborative, and honest manner at all times. Harassment, threatening behavior, or deliberate embarrassment of others will not be permitted. Any conduct that interferes with the quality of the educational experience is not allowed and may result in disciplinary action, such as course failure, probation, suspension, or dismissal. For more information on this topic, please review the Code of Conduct Policy in the University Catalog.